ART in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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1  Thou art his wife, and thy prayers may essay his soul.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
2  Thou art conqueror, and Ausonia hath seen me stretch conquered hands.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK TWELFTH
3  Now must strength, now quickness of hand be tried, now all our art lend her guidance.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
4  We follow thee, holy one of heaven, whoso thou art, and again joyfully obey thy command.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
5  Faunus' father was Picus; and he boasts himself, Saturn, thy son; thou art the first source of their blood.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
6  Whoso thou art, not hated I think of the immortals dost thou draw the breath of life, who hast reached the Tyrian city.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
7  I take heaven, sweet, to witness, and thee, mine own darling sister, I do not willingly arm myself with the arts of magic.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
8  Then Arruns, due to his doom, circles in advance of fleet Camilla with artful javelin, and tries how fortune may be easiest.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK ELEVENTH
9  Copious indeed, Drances, and fluent is ever thy speech at the moment war calls for action; and when the fathers are summoned thou art there the first.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK ELEVENTH
10  Ah my sister, long ere now I knew thee, when first thine arts shattered the treaty, and thou didst mingle in the strife; and now thy godhead conceals itself in vain.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK TWELFTH
11  Thyself art my witness what a sudden stir she raised of late on the Libyan waters, flinging all the seas to heaven in vain reliance on Aeolus' blasts; this she dared in thy realm.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
12  Jupiter,' she cries, 'for thou art reputed lawgiver of hospitality, grant that this be a joyful day to the Tyrians and the voyagers from Troy, a day to live in our children's memory.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
13  Priam himself at once commands his shackles and strait bonds to be undone, and thus speaks with kindly words: "Whoso thou art, now and henceforth dismiss and forget the Greeks: thou shalt be ours."
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
14  But in the Cytherean's breast new arts, new schemes revolve; if Cupid, changed in form and feature, may come in sweet Ascanius' room, and his gifts kindle the queen to madness and set her inmost sense aflame.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
15  And now all moved away in the pride and wealth of their prizes, their brows bound with scarlet ribbons; when, hardly torn loose by all his art from the cruel rock, his oars lost, rowing feebly with a single tier, Sergestus brought in his ship jeered at and unhonoured.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
16  Just then the waterman descried them from the Stygian wave advancing through the silent woodland and turning their feet towards the bank, and opens on them in these words of challenge: 'Whoso thou art who marchest in arms towards our river, forth and say, there as thou art, why thou comest, and stay thine advance.'
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
17  Here is the band of them who bore wounds in fighting for their country, and they who were pure in priesthood while life endured, and the good poets whose speech abased not Apollo; and they who made life beautiful by the arts of their invention, and who won by service a memory among men, the brows of all girt with the snow-white fillet.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
18  While Argolic kings wasted in war the doomed towers of Troy, the fortress fated to fall in hostile fires, no succour did I require for her wretched people, no weapons of thine art and aid: nor would I task, dear my lord, thee or thy toils for naught, though I owed many and many a debt to the children of Priam, and had often wept the sore labour of Aeneas.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
19  And now Iapix son of Iasus came, beloved beyond others of Phoebus, to whom once of old, smitten with sharp desire, Apollo gladly offered his own arts and gifts, augury and the lyre and swift arrows: he, to lengthen out the destiny of a parent given over to die, chose rather to know the potency of herbs and the practice of healing, and deal in a silent art unrenowned.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK TWELFTH
20  And now Iapix son of Iasus came, beloved beyond others of Phoebus, to whom once of old, smitten with sharp desire, Apollo gladly offered his own arts and gifts, augury and the lyre and swift arrows: he, to lengthen out the destiny of a parent given over to die, chose rather to know the potency of herbs and the practice of healing, and deal in a silent art unrenowned.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK TWELFTH