ART in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - art in David Copperfield
1  'By your art, of course,' said Steerforth.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE
2  If you can lay it out for him, I shall do my work with a better art.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. THE BEGINNING OF A LONG JOURNEY
3  She didn't tell Em'ly what she come out fur, lest her 'art should fail, and she should think of hiding of herself.'
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. THE BEGINNING OF A LONGER JOURNEY
4  This extremely artful suggestion Mr. Barkis accompanied with a nudge of his elbow that gave me quite a stitch in my side.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
5  It's such a loving art,' said Mr. Peggotty, smoothing her rich hair with his great hard hand, 'that it can't abear the sorrer of this.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 30. A LOSS
6  As to fitfulness, I have never learnt the art of binding myself to any of the wheels on which the Ixions of these days are turning round and round.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE
7  The good Doctor said she was nervous, and, to relieve her, proposed a round game at cards; of which he knew as much as of the art of playing the trombone.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. I AM A NEW BOY IN MORE SENSES THAN ONE
8  The delight with which Traddles propounded this plan to me, and the sense he had of its uncommon artfulness, are among the freshest things in my remembrance.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. MY AUNT ASTONISHES ME
9  What does this here blessed tarpaulin go and do,' said Mr. Peggotty, with his face one high noon of enjoyment, 'but he loses that there art of his to our little Em'ly.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. LITTLE EM'LY
10  I am in high repute for my accomplishment in all pertaining to the art, and am joined with eleven others in reporting the debates in Parliament for a Morning Newspaper.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 43. ANOTHER RETROSPECT
11  Mas'r Davy, he can remember what she was; you may judge for your own self what she is; but neither of you can't fully know what she has been, is, and will be, to my loving art.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. LITTLE EM'LY
12  I take it, that had its effect upon me, as a touch of nature; but the skill with which the one followed up whatever the other said, was a touch of art which I was still less proof against.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. SOMEBODY TURNS UP
13  If you had only had the condescension to return my confidence when I poured out the fulness of my art, the night I put you so much out of the way by sleeping before your sitting-room fire, I never should have doubted you.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39. WICKFIELD AND HEEP
14  In pursuance of my intention of referring to my own fictions only when their course should incidentally connect itself with the progress of my story, I do not enter on the aspirations, the delights, anxieties, and triumphs of my art.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 61. I AM SHOWN TWO INTERESTING PENITENTS
15  Over the little mantelshelf, was a picture of the 'Sarah Jane' lugger, built at Sunderland, with a real little wooden stern stuck on to it; a work of art, combining composition with carpentry, which I considered to be one of the most enviable possessions that the world could afford.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
16  I had no reason to believe that Littimer understood such arts himself; he never led me to suppose anything of the kind, by so much as the vibration of one of his respectable eyelashes; yet whenever he was by, while we were practising, I felt myself the greenest and most inexperienced of mortals.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. LITTLE EM'LY
17  All these wonders afforded Peggotty as much pleasure as she was able to enjoy, under existing circumstances: except, I think, St. Paul's, which, from her long attachment to her work-box, became a rival of the picture on the lid, and was, in some particulars, vanquished, she considered, by that work of art.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33. BLISSFUL
18  What the knitting was, I don't know, not being learned in that art; but it looked like a net; and as she worked away with those Chinese chopsticks of knitting-needles, she showed in the firelight like an ill-looking enchantress, baulked as yet by the radiant goodness opposite, but getting ready for a cast of her net by and by.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 39. WICKFIELD AND HEEP
19  But Miss Mowcher, finding that I was not at present disposed for any decoration within the range of her art, and that I was, for the time being, proof against the blandishments of the small bottle which she held up before one eye to enforce her persuasions, said we would make a beginning on an early day, and requested the aid of my hand to descend from her elevated station.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. SOME OLD SCENES, AND SOME NEW PEOPLE
20  Various ingenious arrangements he had made, for the disguise of his chest of drawers, and the accommodation of his boots, his shaving-glass, and so forth, particularly impressed themselves upon me, as evidences of the same Traddles who used to make models of elephants' dens in writing-paper to put flies in; and to comfort himself under ill usage, with the memorable works of art I have so often mentioned.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27. TOMMY TRADDLES