BAD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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1  She disgraced herseln everyways, bitter and bad.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XI
2  He had travelled a long way, he wath in a very bad condithon, he wath lame, and pretty well blind.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII
3  He had overstayed his hour in the street outside the Bank, on each of the two first evenings; and nothing had happened there, good or bad.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
4  So, Mr. Gradgrind and his daughter took Cecilia Jupe off with them to Stone Lodge, and on the way Louisa never spoke one word, good or bad.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  Publicly and privately, it were much better for the age in which he lived, that he and the legion of whom he was one were designedly bad, than indifferent and purposeless.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  Body number three, wrote leaden little books for them, showing how the good grown-up baby invariably got to the Savings-bank, and the bad grown-up baby invariably got transported.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VIII
7  Tom Gradgrind, as your son, young Tom, refuses for some obstinate reason or other to say anything at all about those statements, good or bad, I am obliged to confront her with your daughter.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
8  The smoke-serpents were indifferent who was lost or found, who turned out bad or good; the melancholy mad elephants, like the Hard Fact men, abated nothing of their set routine, whatever happened.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V
9  The Old Hell Shaft, the pitman said, with a curse upon it, was worthy of its bad name to the last; for though Stephen could speak now, he believed it would soon be found to have mangled the life out of him.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VI
10  Even that unlucky female, Mrs. Sparsit, fallen from her pinnacle of exultation into the Slough of Despond, was not in so bad a plight as that remarkable man and self-made Humbug, Josiah Bounderby of Coketown.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER V
11  The moral sort of fellows might suppose that Mr. James Harthouse derived some comfortable reflections afterwards, from this prompt retreat, as one of his few actions that made any amends for anything, and as a token to himself that he had escaped the climax of a very bad business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I