BAD in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - bad in Pride and Prejudice
1  I often think," said she, "that there is nothing so bad as parting with one's friends.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 53
2  His circumstances, he assured me, and I had no difficulty in believing it, were exceedingly bad.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
3  Dearest Lizzy, I hardly know what I would write, but I have bad news for you, and it cannot be delayed.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 46
4  Poor Lydia's situation must, at best, be bad enough; but that it was no worse, she had need to be thankful.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 49
5  Jane was therefore obliged to go on horseback, and her mother attended her to the door with many cheerful prognostics of a bad day.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 7
6  Her manners were pronounced to be very bad indeed, a mixture of pride and impertinence; she had no conversation, no style, no beauty.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8
7  Through letters, whatever of good or bad was to be told would be communicated, and every succeeding day was expected to bring some news of importance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 48
8  That his two sisters and Mr. Darcy, however, should have such an opportunity of ridiculing her relations, was bad enough, and she could not determine whether the silent contempt of the gentleman, or the insolent smiles of the ladies, were more intolerable.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
9  The sisters, on hearing this, repeated three or four times how much they were grieved, how shocking it was to have a bad cold, and how excessively they disliked being ill themselves; and then thought no more of the matter: and their indifference towards Jane when not immediately before them restored Elizabeth to the enjoyment of all her former dislike.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 8