BEAUTY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift
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 Current Search - beauty in Gulliver's Travels
1  Some of the latter had already been to see me, and reported strange things of my beauty, behaviour, and good sense.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER III.
2  The women were proposed to be taxed according to their beauty and skill in dressing, wherein they had the same privilege with the men, to be determined by their own judgment.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER VI.
3  When my clothes were worn to rags, I made myself others with the skins of rabbits, and of a certain beautiful animal, about the same size, called nnuhnoh, the skin of which is covered with a fine down.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 4: CHAPTER X.
4  If they would, for example, praise the beauty of a woman, or any other animal, they describe it by rhombs, circles, parallelograms, ellipses, and other geometrical terms, or by words of art drawn from music, needless here to repeat.
Gulliver's Travels(V2) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 3: CHAPTER II.
5  For I have always borne that laudable partiality to my own country, which Dionysius Halicarnassensis, with so much justice, recommends to an historian: I would hide the frailties and deformities of my political mother, and place her virtues and beauties in the most advantageous light.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER VII.
6  This made me reflect upon the fair skins of our English ladies, who appear so beautiful to us, only because they are of our own size, and their defects not to be seen but through a magnifying glass; where we find by experiment that the smoothest and whitest skins look rough, and coarse, and ill-coloured.
Gulliver's Travels(V1) By Jonathan Swift
Get Context   In PART 2: CHAPTER I.