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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - bed in Moby Dick
1  No man prefers to sleep two in a bed.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
2  Folding back the counterpane, I stooped over the bed.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
3  But I don't fancy having a man smoking in bed with me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
4  I turned round from eyeing the bed, but he had disappeared.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
5  There's plenty of room for two to kick about in that bed; it's an almighty big bed that.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
6  I sat down on the side of the bed, and commenced thinking about this head-peddling harpooneer, and his door mat.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
7  But though the other boarders kept coming in by ones, twos, and threes, and going to bed, yet no sign of my harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
8  The next moment the light was extinguished, and this wild cannibal, tomahawk between his teeth, sprang into bed with me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
9  But thank heaven, at that moment the landlord came into the room light in hand, and leaping from the bed I ran up to him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
10  Euroclydon, nevertheless, is a mighty pleasant zephyr to any one in-doors, with his feet on the hob quietly toasting for bed.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. The Carpet-Bag.
11  At any rate, I made up my mind that if it so turned out that we should sleep together, he must undress and get into bed before I did.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
12  I come to your house and want a bed; you tell me you can only give me half a one; that the other half belongs to a certain harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
13  Likewise, there was a parcel of outlandish bone fish hooks on the shelf over the fire-place, and a tall harpoon standing at the head of the bed.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
14  So saying he procured the plane; and with his old silk handkerchief first dusting the bench, vigorously set to planing away at my bed, the while grinning like an ape.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
15  Nor was there any earthly reason why I as a sailor should sleep two in a bed, more than anybody else; for sailors no more sleep two in a bed at sea, than bachelor Kings do ashore.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
16  I considered the matter a moment, and then up stairs we went, and I was ushered into a small room, cold as a clam, and furnished, sure enough, with a prodigious bed, almost big enough indeed for any four harpooneers to sleep abreast.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
17  Still, looking round me again, and seeing no possible chance of spending a sufferable night unless in some other person's bed, I began to think that after all I might be cherishing unwarrantable prejudices against this unknown harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
18  All these queer proceedings increased my uncomfortableness, and seeing him now exhibiting strong symptoms of concluding his business operations, and jumping into bed with me, I thought it was high time, now or never, before the light was put out, to break the spell in which I had so long been bound.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
19  Holding a light in one hand, and that identical New Zealand head in the other, the stranger entered the room, and without looking towards the bed, placed his candle a good way off from me on the floor in one corner, and then began working away at the knotted cords of the large bag I before spoke of as being in the room.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
20  But beginning to feel very cold now, half undressed as I was, and remembering what the landlord said about the harpooneer's not coming home at all that night, it being so very late, I made no more ado, but jumped out of my pantaloons and boots, and then blowing out the light tumbled into bed, and commended myself to the care of heaven.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.