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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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1  The stout sail-boat that had accompanied us began ranging alongside.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 22. Merry Christmas.
2  And so saying the lighted tomahawk began flourishing about me in the dark.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
3  The strong vapour now completely filling the contracted hole, it began to tell upon him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. Going Aboard.
4  I could not help it, but I began to feel suspicious of this "dark complexioned" harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
5  I sang out, I could not help it now; and giving a sudden grunt of astonishment he began feeling me.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
6  Wild he was; a very sight of sights to see; yet I began to feel myself mysteriously drawn towards him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
7  I began to think it was high time to settle with myself at what terms I would be willing to engage for the voyage.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16. The Ship.
8  Chowder for breakfast, and chowder for dinner, and chowder for supper, till you began to look for fish-bones coming through your clothes.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15. Chowder.
9  The liquor soon mounted into their heads, as it generally does even with the arrantest topers newly landed from sea, and they began capering about most obstreperously.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
10  I began to grow vexed with him; it seemed so downright senseless and insane to be sitting there all day and half the night on his hams in a cold room, holding a piece of wood on his head.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 17. The Ramadan.
11  It was now about nine o'clock, and the room seeming almost supernaturally quiet after these orgies, I began to congratulate myself upon a little plan that had occurred to me just previous to the entrance of the seamen.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
12  As the sky grew less gloomy; indeed, began to grow a little genial, he became still less and less a recluse; as if, when the ship had sailed from home, nothing but the dead wintry bleakness of the sea had then kept him so secluded.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Ahab.
13  Still, looking round me again, and seeing no possible chance of spending a sufferable night unless in some other person's bed, I began to think that after all I might be cherishing unwarrantable prejudices against this unknown harpooneer.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
14  And once Daggoo, seized with a sudden humor, assisted Dough-Boy's memory by snatching him up bodily, and thrusting his head into a great empty wooden trencher, while Tashtego, knife in hand, began laying out the circle preliminary to scalping him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 34. The Cabin-Table.
15  Holding a light in one hand, and that identical New Zealand head in the other, the stranger entered the room, and without looking towards the bed, placed his candle a good way off from me on the floor in one corner, and then began working away at the knotted cords of the large bag I before spoke of as being in the room.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
16  Yes, we became very wakeful; so much so that our recumbent position began to grow wearisome, and by little and little we found ourselves sitting up; the clothes well tucked around us, leaning against the head-board with our four knees drawn up close together, and our two noses bending over them, as if our kneepans were warming-pans.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. Nightgown.
17  As I sat there in that now lonely room; the fire burning low, in that mild stage when, after its first intensity has warmed the air, it then only glows to be looked at; the evening shades and phantoms gathering round the casements, and peering in upon us silent, solitary twain; the storm booming without in solemn swells; I began to be sensible of strange feelings.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
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