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Quotes from Sense and Sensibility by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - began in Sense and Sensibility
1  In a firm, though cautious tone, Elinor thus began.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 24
2  As soon as they were out of the house, his enquiries began.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 33
3  Elinor now began to make the tea, and Marianne was obliged to appear again.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
4  And then to turn the discourse, she began admiring the house and the furniture.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21
5  Her love made no answer; and after slightly bowing to the ladies, began complaining of the weather.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
6  She began by inquiring if they saw much of Mr. Willoughby at Cleveland, and whether they were intimately acquainted with him.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
7  The private balls at the park then began; and parties on the water were made and accomplished as often as a showery October would allow.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
8  The card-table was then placed, and Elinor began to wonder at herself for having ever entertained a hope of finding time for conversation at the park.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 23
9  Marianne began now to perceive that the desperation which had seized her at sixteen and a half, of ever seeing a man who could satisfy her ideas of perfection, had been rash and unjustifiable.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
10  Towards this home, she began on the approach of January to turn her thoughts, and thither she one day abruptly, and very unexpectedly by them, asked the elder Misses Dashwood to accompany her.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 25
11  But Mrs. Dashwood began shortly to give over every hope of the kind, and to be convinced, from the general drift of his discourse, that his assistance extended no farther than their maintenance for six months at Norland.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 5
12  She began almost to feel a dislike of Edward; and it ended, as every feeling must end with her, by carrying back her thoughts to Willoughby, whose manners formed a contrast sufficiently striking to those of his brother elect.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
13  Their attention and wit were drawn off to his more fortunate rival; and the raillery which the other had incurred before any partiality arose, was removed when his feelings began really to call for the ridicule so justly annexed to sensibility.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
14  He heard her with the most earnest attention, but seeming to recollect himself, said no more on the subject, and began directly to speak of his pleasure at seeing them in London, making the usual inquiries about their journey, and the friends they had left behind.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 26
15  About the middle of the day, Mrs. Jennings went out by herself on business, and Elinor began her letter directly, while Marianne, too restless for employment, too anxious for conversation, walked from one window to the other, or sat down by the fire in melancholy meditation.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27
16  Elinor began to find this impertinence too much for her temper; but she was saved the trouble of checking it, by Lucy's sharp reprimand, which now, as on many occasions, though it did not give much sweetness to the manners of one sister, was of advantage in governing those of the other.
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32
17  When we met him, he turned back and walked with us; and so we began talking of my brother and sister, and one thing and another, and I said to him, 'So, Colonel, there is a new family come to Barton cottage, I hear, and mama sends me word they are very pretty, and that one of them is going to be married to Mr. Willoughby of Combe Magna.'
Sense and Sensibility By Jane Austen
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20
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