BEST in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - best in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1  I was meaning for the best, Tom.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
2  He found that in the best tavern, No.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
3  I know you was meaning for the best, aunty, and so was I with Peter.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
4  He wanted to explore its borders, but concluded that it would be best to sit down and rest awhile, first.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
5  The Thatchers were there, the Harpers, the Rogerses, Aunt Polly, Sid, Mary, the minister, the editor, and a great many more, and all dressed in their best.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
6  She said she would do her best by him, because, whether he was good, bad, or indifferent, he was the Lord's, and nothing that was the Lord's was a thing to be neglected.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
7  He said he meant to look to it that Tom should be admitted to the National Military Academy and afterward trained in the best law school in the country, in order that he might be ready for either career or both.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXV
8  It seemed to him that life was but a trouble, at best, and he more than half envied Jimmy Hodges, so lately released; it must be very peaceful, he thought, to lie and slumber and dream forever and ever, with the wind whispering through the trees and caressing the grass and the flowers over the grave, and nothing to bother and grieve about, ever any more.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
9  Here was a gorgeous triumph; they were missed; they were mourned; hearts were breaking on their account; tears were being shed; accusing memories of unkindness to these poor lost lads were rising up, and unavailing regrets and remorse were being indulged; and best of all, the departed were the talk of the whole town, and the envy of all the boys, as far as this dazzling notoriety was concerned.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV