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Quotes from Wuthering Heights by Emily Bronte
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 Current Search - both in Wuthering Heights
1  They were both very attentive to her comfort, certainly.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
2  At least, I suppose the weeping was on both sides; as it seemed Heathcliff could weep on a great occasion like this.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
3  Her family were of a delicate constitution: she and Edgar both lacked the ruddy health that you will generally meet in these parts.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVIII
4  But the poor dame had reason to repent of her kindness: she and her husband both took the fever, and died within a few days of each other.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
5  Heathcliff held both bridles as they rode on, and they set their faces from the village, and went as fast as the rough roads would let them.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII
6  The last glimpse I caught of him was a furious rush on his part, checked by the embrace of his host; and both fell locked together on the hearth.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
7  Though I would give no information, he discovered, through some of the other servants, both her place of residence and the existence of the child.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII
8  Catherine had reached her full height; her figure was both plump and slender, elastic as steel, and her whole aspect sparkling with health and spirits.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
9  They both promised fair to grow up as rude as savages; the young master being entirely negligent how they behaved, and what they did, so they kept clear of him.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI
10  You may, however, fall out, at last, over something of equal consequence to both sides; and then those you term weak are very capable of being as obstinate as you.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
11  I wanted something to happen which might have the effect of freeing both Wuthering Heights and the Grange of Mr. Heathcliff quietly; leaving us as we had been prior to his advent.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
12  She stamped her foot, wavered a moment, and then, irresistibly impelled by the naughty spirit within her, slapped me on the cheek: a stinging blow that filled both eyes with water.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
13  I observed several splashes of blood about the bark of the tree, and his hand and forehead were both stained; probably the scene I witnessed was a repetition of others acted during the night.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
14  We were both of us nodding ere any one invaded our retreat, and then it was Joseph, shuffling down a wooden ladder that vanished in the roof, through a trap: the ascent to his garret, I suppose.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
15  But they are very much alike: they are spoiled children, and fancy the world was made for their accommodation; and though I humour both, I think a smart chastisement might improve them all the same.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
16  One end, indeed, reflected splendidly both light and heat from ranks of immense pewter dishes, interspersed with silver jugs and tankards, towering row after row, on a vast oak dresser, to the very roof.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
17  Not a soul knew to whom it belonged, he said; and his money and time being both limited, he thought it better to take it home with him at once, than run into vain expenses there: because he was determined he would not leave it as he found it.
Wuthering Heights By Emily Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
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