BOYS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - boys in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1  The boys all hated him, he was so good.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
2  That is the way good little boys and girls should do.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
3  Tom had no handkerchief, and he looked upon boys who had as snobs.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
4  The two boys were sworn friends all the week, and embattled enemies on Saturdays.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
5  So he returned his straitened means to his pocket, and gave up the idea of trying to buy the boys.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
6  He waylaid other boys as they came, and went on buying tickets of various colors ten or fifteen minutes longer.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
7  There was no lack of material; boys happened along every little while; they came to jeer, but remained to whitewash.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
8  He wandered far from the accustomed haunts of boys, and sought desolate places that were in harmony with his spirit.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
9  White, mulatto, and negro boys and girls were always there waiting their turns, resting, trading playthings, quarrelling, fighting, skylarking.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER II
10  Tom enclosed the tick in the percussion-cap box that had lately been the pinchbug's prison, and the boys separated, each feeling wealthier than before.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
11  He entered the church, now, with a swarm of clean and noisy boys and girls, proceeded to his seat and started a quarrel with the first boy that came handy.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
12  Tom was like the rest of the respectable boys, in that he envied Huckleberry his gaudy outcast condition, and was under strict orders not to play with him.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
13  The little girls "showed off" in various ways, and the little boys "showed off" with such diligence that the air was thick with paper wads and the murmur of scufflings.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
14  He presently got safely beyond the reach of capture and punishment, and hastened toward the public square of the village, where two "military" companies of boys had met for conflict, according to previous appointment.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
15  In an instant both boys were rolling and tumbling in the dirt, gripped together like cats; and for the space of a minute they tugged and tore at each other's hair and clothes, punched and scratched each other's nose, and covered themselves with dust and glory.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER I
16  The latter third of the speech was marred by the resumption of fights and other recreations among certain of the bad boys, and by fidgetings and whisperings that extended far and wide, washing even to the bases of isolated and incorruptible rocks like Sid and Mary.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
17  The tick tried this, that, and the other course, and got as excited and as anxious as the boys themselves, but time and again just as he would have victory in his very grasp, so to speak, and Tom's fingers would be twitching to begin, Joe's pin would deftly head him off, and keep possession.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
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