BRAIN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - brain in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  Suddenly a wild hope flashed across his brain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
2  I was dominated, soul, brain, and power, by you.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
3  It has been said that the great events of the world take place in the brain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
4  Suddenly there had fallen upon his brain that tiny scarlet speck that makes men mad.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 7
5  The heavy odour of incense seemed to cling about its pages and to trouble the brain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
6  It is in the brain, and the brain only, that the great sins of the world take place also.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
7  Leonardus Camillus had seen a white stone taken from the brain of a newly killed toad, that was a certain antidote against poison.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
8  Gradually the events of the preceding night crept with silent, blood-stained feet into his brain and reconstructed themselves there with terrible distinctness.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
9  From cell to cell of his brain crept the one thought; and the wild desire to live, most terrible of all man's appetites, quickened into force each trembling nerve and fibre.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
10  There was a gem in the brain of the dragon, Philostratus told us, and "by the exhibition of golden letters and a scarlet robe" the monster could be thrown into a magical sleep and slain.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
11  But he suddenly started up, and closing his eyes, placed his fingers upon the lids, as though he sought to imprison within his brain some curious dream from which he feared he might awake.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1
12  He knew what was waiting for him there; saw it, indeed, and, shuddering, crushed with dank hands his burning lids as though he would have robbed the very brain of sight and driven the eyeballs back into their cave.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
13  The brain had its own food on which it battened, and the imagination, made grotesque by terror, twisted and distorted as a living thing by pain, danced like some foul puppet on a stand and grinned through moving masks.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14
14  There are moments, psychologists tell us, when the passion for sin, or for what the world calls sin, so dominates a nature that every fibre of the body, as every cell of the brain, seems to be instinct with fearful impulses.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
15  There were times when it appeared to Dorian Gray that the whole of history was merely the record of his own life, not as he had lived it in act and circumstance, but as his imagination had created it for him, as it had been in his brain and in his passions.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
16  It was true that as one watched life in its curious crucible of pain and pleasure, one could not wear over one's face a mask of glass, nor keep the sulphurous fumes from troubling the brain and making the imagination turbid with monstrous fancies and misshapen dreams.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4
17  He watched it with that strange interest in trivial things that we try to develop when things of high import make us afraid, or when we are stirred by some new emotion for which we cannot find expression, or when some thought that terrifies us lays sudden siege to the brain and calls on us to yield.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2
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