BUSINESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - business in Hard Times
1  The business was all Fact, from first to last.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XVI
2  I come to a question that may shorten the business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
3  They were right; they had no business to do anything else.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV
4  You said just now, that you had nothing to tell us about this business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V
5  Yesterday afternoon, at the close of business hours, everything was put away as usual.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
6  Stephen shook his head, mutely protesting that indeed he had other business to do for his life.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V
7  No alarm takes place, till this chap, Bitzer, turns out this morning, and begins to open and prepare the offices for business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII
8  So the time went on; until it happened that Mr. Bounderby was called away from home by business which required his presence elsewhere, for three or four days.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
9  Seated, with her needlework or netting apparatus, at the window, she had a self-laudatory sense of correcting, by her ladylike deportment, the rude business aspect of the place.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I
10  There were two or three handsome young women among them, with their two or three husbands, and their two or three mothers, and their eight or nine little children, who did the fairy business when required.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
11  Many ears and eyes were busy with a vision of the matter of these placards, among turning spindles, rattling looms, and whirling wheels, for hours afterwards; and when the Hands cleared out again into the streets, there were still as many readers as before.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
12  The member of the fluffy classes was injured, exasperated, left the house grumbling, met somebody who proposed to him to go in for some share in this Bank business, went in, put something in his pocket which had nothing in it before, and relieved his mind extremely.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
13  But, I am not in a very agreeable state, I tell you plainly: not relishing this business, even as it is, and not considering that I am at any time as dutifully and submissively treated by your daughter, as Josiah Bounderby of Coketown ought to be treated by his wife.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
14  In boastful proof of his promptitude and activity, as a remarkable man, and a self-made man, and a commercial wonder more admirable than Venus, who had risen out of the mud instead of the sea, he liked to show how little his domestic affairs abated his business ardour.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER III
15  Mr. Bounderby, under the influence of this difficult adjuration, backed up by her compassionate eye, could only scratch his head in a feeble and ridiculous manner, and afterwards assert himself at a distance, by being heard to bully the small fry of business all the morning.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER X
16  The moral sort of fellows might suppose that Mr. James Harthouse derived some comfortable reflections afterwards, from this prompt retreat, as one of his few actions that made any amends for anything, and as a token to himself that he had escaped the climax of a very bad business.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I