CARE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - care in Great Expectations
1  I don't care for what you say at all.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
2  I was very careful indeed as to that.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LI
3  All right," said Wemmick, "they shall be taken care of.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
4  Of course, I had taken care that the boat should be ready and everything in order.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
5  I had taken care to have it well understood in Little Britain when my birthday was.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVI
6  Having thought of the matter with care, I approached my subject as if I had never hinted at it before.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXVII
7  The tide ran strong, I took care to lose none of it, and our steady stroke carried us on thoroughly well.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
8  Provis was to be strictly careful while I was gone, and Herbert was to take the charge of him that I had taken.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIII
9  Joe recited this couplet with such manifest pride and careful perspicuity, that I asked him if he had made it himself.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
10  My first care was to close the shutters, so that no light might be seen from without, and then to close and make fast the doors.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIX
11  My sister was never left alone now; but Joe more than readily undertook the care of her on that Sunday afternoon, and Biddy and I went out together.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVII
12  When I looked back at Joe in the long passage, he was still weighing his hat with the greatest care, and was coming after us in long strides on the tips of his toes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
13  The wind being as fierce as ever, we did not care to endanger the light in the lantern by rekindling the extinguished lamps on the staircase, but we examined the staircase from the bottom to the top and found no one there.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XL
14  When the waiter had felt my fast-cooling teapot with the palm of his hand, and had looked imploringly at me, and had gone out, Drummle, careful not to move the shoulder next me, took a cigar from his pocket and bit the end off, but showed no sign of stirring.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIII
15  Too heavily out of sorts to care much at the time whether it were he or no, or after all to touch the breakfast, I washed the weather and the journey from my face and hands, and went out to the memorable old house that it would have been so much the better for me never to have entered, never to have seen.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIII
16  I was nearly going away without the pie, but I was tempted to mount upon a shelf, to look what it was that was put away so carefully in a covered earthen ware dish in a corner, and I found it was the pie, and I took it in the hope that it was not intended for early use, and would not be missed for some time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
17  At once ferocious and maudlin, I was made to murder my uncle with no extenuating circumstances whatever; Millwood put me down in argument, on every occasion; it became sheer monomania in my master's daughter to care a button for me; and all I can say for my gasping and procrastinating conduct on the fatal morning, is, that it was worthy of the general feebleness of my character.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV
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