CAVE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - cave in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1  Tom Sawyer knew as much of the cave as any one.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
2  The physicians were all at the cave, so the Widow Douglas came and took charge of the patient.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
3  When the cave door was unlocked, a sorrowful sight presented itself in the dim twilight of the place.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
4  Judge Thatcher sent messages of hope and encouragement from the cave, but they conveyed no real cheer.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
5  Three days and nights of toil and hunger in the cave were not to be shaken off at once, as Tom and Becky soon discovered.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
6  The Judge and some friends set Tom to talking, and some one asked him ironically if he wouldn't like to go to the cave again.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
7  Still drifting along and talking, they scarcely noticed that they were now in a part of the cave whose walls were not frescoed.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
8  It would be complete, however, as soon as the messenger dispatched with the great news to the cave should get the word to her husband.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
9  Well, the women get to loving you, and after they've been in the cave a week or two weeks they stop crying and after that you couldn't get them to leave.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
10  They wound this way and that, far down into the secret depths of the cave, made another mark, and branched off in search of novelties to tell the upper world about.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
11  Public prayers had been offered up for them, and many and many a private prayer that had the petitioner's whole heart in it; but still no good news came from the cave.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
12  WITHIN a few minutes the news had spread, and a dozen skiff-loads of men were on their way to McDougal's cave, and the ferryboat, well filled with passengers, soon followed.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
13  Before day-dawn, Judge Thatcher and the handful of searchers with him were tracked out, in the cave, by the twine clews they had strung behind them, and informed of the great news.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
14  They tried to estimate how long they had been in the cave, but all they knew was that it seemed days and weeks, and yet it was plain that this could not be, for their candles were not gone yet.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
15  About a fortnight after Tom's rescue from the cave, he started off to visit Huck, who had grown plenty strong enough, now, to hear exciting talk, and Tom had some that would interest him, he thought.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXII
16  By-and-by, one group after another came straggling back to the mouth of the cave, panting, hilarious, smeared from head to foot with tallow drippings, daubed with clay, and entirely delighted with the success of the day.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
17  It is many and many a year since the hapless half-breed scooped out the stone to catch the priceless drops, but to this day the tourist stares longest at that pathetic stone and that slow-dropping water when he comes to see the wonders of McDougal's cave.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
18  Joe was for being a hermit, and living on crusts in a remote cave, and dying, some time, of cold and want and grief; but after listening to Tom, he conceded that there were some conspicuous advantages about a life of crime, and so he consented to be a pirate.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
19  Tom kissed her, with a choking sensation in his throat, and made a show of being confident of finding the searchers or an escape from the cave; then he took the kite-line in his hand and went groping down one of the passages on his hands and knees, distressed with hunger and sick with bodings of coming doom.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI
20  Injun Joe was buried near the mouth of the cave; and people flocked there in boats and wagons from the towns and from all the farms and hamlets for seven miles around; they brought their children, and all sorts of provisions, and confessed that they had had almost as satisfactory a time at the funeral as they could have had at the hanging.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
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