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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - changed in Great Expectations
1  This time, he was entirely changed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXX
2  Within a single year all this was changed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIV
3  Mrs. Coiler then changed the subject and began to flatter me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIII
4  This changed the subject in an instant, and made us hurriedly resolve to go to the play.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXX
5  "Since your change of fortune and prospects, you have changed your companions," said Estella.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIX
6  We changed again, and yet again, and it was now too late and too far to go back, and I went on.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
7  At first, I kept above Blackfriars Bridge; but as the hours of the tide changed, I took towards London Bridge.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLVI
8  But then, as Herbert changed the bandages, more by the light of the fire than by the outer light, he went back to it spontaneously.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter L
9  After I had turned the worst point of my illness, I began to notice that while all its other features changed, this one consistent feature did not change.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter LVII
10  Sarah Pocket came to the gate, and positively reeled back when she saw me so changed; her walnut-shell countenance likewise turned from brown to green and yellow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
11  We changed, and I had not made up my mind, and still reflected for my comfort that it would be quite practicable to get down and walk back, when we changed again.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
12  "This is a gay figure, Pip," said she, making her crutch stick play round me, as if she, the fairy godmother who had changed me, were bestowing the finishing gift.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
13  But she was so much changed, was so much more beautiful, so much more womanly, in all things winning admiration, had made such wonderful advance, that I seemed to have made none.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXIX
14  Indeed, I was not only so changed in the course of nature, but so differently dressed and so differently circumstanced, that it was not at all likely he could have known me without accidental help.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXVIII
15  I noticed that after the funeral Joe changed his clothes so far, as to make a compromise between his Sunday dress and working dress; in which the dear fellow looked natural, and like the Man he was.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XXXV
16  So subdued I was by those tears, and by their breaking out again in the course of the quiet walk, that when I was on the coach, and it was clear of the town, I deliberated with an aching heart whether I would not get down when we changed horses and walk back, and have another evening at home, and a better parting.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XIX
17  Though every vestige of her dress was burnt, as they told me, she still had something of her old ghastly bridal appearance; for, they had covered her to the throat with white cotton-wool, and as she lay with a white sheet loosely overlying that, the phantom air of something that had been and was changed was still upon her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In Chapter XLIX
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