CHILD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - child in David Copperfield
1  'Yes, child,' said my aunt, rubbing her nose again.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME
2  'Well, child,' said my aunt, when I went downstairs.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME
3  If ever child were stricken with sincere grief, I was.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9. I HAVE A MEMORABLE BIRTHDAY
4  She was the motherless child of a sort of cousin of my father's.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 20. STEERFORTH'S HOME
5  From the moment of this girl's birth, child, I intend to be her friend.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. I AM BORN
6  I will not have this room shunned as if it were infected, at the pleasure of a child.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
7  I know that I worked, from morning until night, with common men and boys, a shabby child.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
8  'You'll consider yourself guardian, jointly with me, of this child, Mr. Dick,' said my aunt.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME
9  It seemed to my imagination as if the portrait had grown womanly, and the original remained a child.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 15. I MAKE ANOTHER BEGINNING
10  The days sported by us, as if Time had not grown up himself yet, but were a child too, and always at play.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
11  I dare say no words she could have uttered would have affected me so much, then, as her calling me her child.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. I FALL INTO DISGRACE
12  Because she has not seen enough of the evil attending such things, she goes and gets married next, as the child relates.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. THE SEQUEL OF MY RESOLUTION
13  I am sure my fancy raised up something round that blue-eyed mite of a child, which etherealized, and made a very angel of her.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
14  There was a pretty woman at the back of the shop, dancing a little child in her arms, while another little fellow clung to her apron.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. LITTLE EM'LY
15  It was cold still weather; and not a hair of her head, nor a fold of her dress, was stirred, as she looked intently at me, holding up her child.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 8. MY HOLIDAYS. ESPECIALLY ONE HAPPY AFTERNOON
16  I was such a child, and so little, that frequently when I went into the bar of a strange public-house for a glass of ale or porter, to moisten what I had had for dinner, they were afraid to give it me.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
17  A child of excellent abilities, and with strong powers of observation, quick, eager, delicate, and soon hurt bodily or mentally, it seems wonderful to me that nobody should have made any sign in my behalf.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. I BEGIN LIFE ON MY OWN ACCOUNT, AND DON'T ...
18  There was a table, and a Dutch clock, and a chest of drawers, and on the chest of drawers there was a tea-tray with a painting on it of a lady with a parasol, taking a walk with a military-looking child who was trundling a hoop.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. I HAVE A CHANGE
19  'That was the time, Mr. Murdstone, when she gave birth to her boy here,' said my aunt; 'to the poor child you sometimes tormented her through afterwards, which is a disagreeable remembrance and makes the sight of him odious now.'
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 14. MY AUNT MAKES UP HER MIND ABOUT ME
20  I liked him no better than at first, and had the same uneasy jealousy of him; but if I had any reason for it beyond a child's instinctive dislike, and a general idea that Peggotty and I could make much of my mother without any help, it certainly was not THE reason that I might have found if I had been older.
David Copperfield By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In CHAPTER 2. I OBSERVE