CHILD in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - child in Great Expectations
1  Miss Havisham, you must know, was a spoilt child.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
2  No, she was not an only child; she had a half-brother.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
3  "He was, if ever a child was," said my sister, most emphatically.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
4  He told me that he would look about him for such an orphan child.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
5  "It's not the question, my dear child, who paid for them," returned Camilla.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
6  I know more of the history of Miss Havisham's adopted child than Miss Havisham herself does, sir.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LI
7  You say they are marks of finger-nails, and you set up the hypothesis that she destroyed her child.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
8  This acquitted young woman and Provis had a little child; a little child of whom Provis was exceedingly fond.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter L
9  For anything we know, she may have destroyed her child, and the child in clinging to her may have scratched her hands.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
10  Millers, who was the other nurse, retired into the house, and by degrees the child's wailing was hushed and stopped, as if it were a young ventriloquist with something in its mouth.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
11  When I offered to your sister to keep company, and to be asked in church at such times as she was willing and ready to come to the forge, I said to her, 'And bring the poor little child.'
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
12  That she had done a grievous thing in taking an impressionable child to mould into the form that her wild resentment, spurned affection, and wounded pride found vengeance in, I knew full well.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
13  It may be only small injustice that the child can be exposed to; but the child is small, and its world is small, and its rocking-horse stands as many hands high, according to scale, as a big-boned Irish hunter.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
14  'Consequence, my mother and me we ran away from my father several times; and then my mother she'd go out to work, and she'd say, "Joe," she'd say, "now, please God, you shall have some schooling, child," and she'd put me to school.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
15  Put the case that a woman, under such circumstances as you have mentioned, held her child concealed, and was obliged to communicate the fact to her legal adviser, on his representing to her that he must know, with an eye to the latitude of his defence, how the fact stood about that child.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LI
16  She watched his countenance as if she were particularly wishful to be assured that he took kindly to his reception, she showed every possible desire to conciliate him, and there was an air of humble propitiation in all she did, such as I have seen pervade the bearing of a child towards a hard master.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
17  Now, whether," pursued Herbert, "he had used the child's mother ill, or whether he had used the child's mother well, Provis doesn't say; but she had shared some four or five years of the wretched life he described to us at this fireside, and he seems to have felt pity for her, and forbearance towards her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter L
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.