CHILDREN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Hard Times by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - children in Hard Times
1  This is the principle on which I bring up my own children, and this is the principle on which I bring up these children.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I
2  Stephen sat upon the step of a door, leaned against a wall under an archway, strolled up and down, listened for the church clock, stopped and watched children playing in the street.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI
3  There were two or three handsome young women among them, with their two or three husbands, and their two or three mothers, and their eight or nine little children, who did the fairy business when required.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
4  Then they pressed about her, and bent over her in very natural attitudes, kissing and embracing her: and brought the children to take leave of her; and were a tender-hearted, simple, foolish set of women altogether.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
5  But, the turning of the road took him by the back of the booth, and at the back of the booth a number of children were congregated in a number of stealthy attitudes, striving to peep in at the hidden glories of the place.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
6  I, who came here to inform the father of the poor girl, Jupe, that she could not be received at the school any more, in consequence of there being practical objections, into which I need not enter, to the reception there of the children of persons so employed, am prepared in these altered circumstances to make a proposal.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V
7  They were ruined, when they were required to send labouring children to school; they were ruined when inspectors were appointed to look into their works; they were ruined, when such inspectors considered it doubtful whether they were quite justified in chopping people up with their machinery; they were utterly undone, when it was hinted that perhaps they need not always make quite so much smoke.
Hard Times By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I