CHILDREN in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Narrative of the Life by Frederick Douglass
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 Current Search - children in The Narrative of the Life
1  The white children could tell their ages.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER I
2  The children were regarded as being quite an addition to his wealth.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER X
3  The ties that ordinarily bind children to their homes were all suspended in my case.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER V
4  The children, the unconscious children, who once sang and danced in her presence, are gone.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER VIII
5  There were a number of slave children that might have been sent from the plantation to Baltimore.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER V
6  The allowance of the slave children was given to their mothers, or the old women having the care of them.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
7  Instead of the voices of her children, she hears by day the moans of the dove, and by night the screams of the hideous owl.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER VIII
8  As to my own treatment while I lived on Colonel Lloyd's plantation, it was very similar to that of the other slave children.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER V
9  It is a common custom, in the part of Maryland from which I ran away, to part children from their mothers at a very early age.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER I
10  I had always lived with my grandmother on the outskirts of the plantation, where she was put to raise the children of the younger women.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER I
11  There were horses and men, cattle and women, pigs and children, all holding the same rank in the scale of being, and were all subjected to the same narrow examination.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER VIII
12  I have seen him whip a woman, causing the blood to run half an hour at the time; and this, too, in the midst of her crying children, pleading for their mother's release.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
13  The children unable to work in the field had neither shoes, stockings, jackets, nor trousers, given to them; their clothing consisted of two coarse linen shirts per year.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER II
14  I saw few or no dilapidated houses, with poverty-stricken inmates; no half-naked children and barefooted women, such as I had been accustomed to see in Hillsborough, Easton, St. Michael's, and Baltimore.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER XI
15  The children were then called, like so many pigs, and like so many pigs they would come and devour the mush; some with oyster-shells, others with pieces of shingle, some with naked hands, and none with spoons.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER V
16  I used also to carry bread with me, enough of which was always in the house, and to which I was always welcome; for I was much better off in this regard than many of the poor white children in our neighborhood.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER VII
17  She is ever disposed to find fault with them; they can seldom do any thing to please her; she is never better pleased than when she sees them under the lash, especially when she suspects her husband of showing to his mulatto children favors which he withholds from his black slaves.
The Narrative of the Life By Frederick Douglass
ContextHighlight   In CHAPTER I
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