CLOCK in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - clock in Great Expectations
1  There was a clock in the outer wall of this house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  Our time of starting from the Cross Keys was two o'clock.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
3  At nine o'clock every night, Greenwich time," said Wemmick, "the gun fires.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
4  I also went to the coach-office and took my place for seven o'clock on Saturday morning.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
5  Something clicked in his throat as if he had works in him like a clock, and was going to strike.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
6  The punch being very nice, we sat there drinking it and talking, until it was almost nine o'clock.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
7  Thither I went, and there I found him, putting the key of his safe down his back as the clock struck.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
8  He replied that it would give him much pleasure, and that he would expect me at the office at six o'clock.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
9  He would call at Barnard's Hotel Tuesday morning at nine o'clock, when if not agreeable please leave word.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
10  Like the clock in Miss Havisham's room, and like Miss Havisham's watch, it had stopped at twenty minutes to nine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
11  We arrived there at two or three o'clock in the afternoon, and had very little way to walk to Mr. Pocket's house.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
12  Well," said Joe, glancing up at the Dutch clock, "she's been on the Ram-page, this last spell, about five minutes, Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
13  Joe had been at the Three Jolly Bargemen, smoking his pipe, from a quarter after eight o'clock to a quarter before ten.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVI
14  It was then I began to understand that everything in the room had stopped, like the watch and the clock, a long time ago.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
15  It was Christmas Eve, and I had to stir the pudding for next day, with a copper-stick, from seven to eight by the Dutch clock.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter II
16  Mr. Pumblechook and I breakfasted at eight o'clock in the parlor behind the shop, while the shopman took his mug of tea and hunch of bread and butter on a sack of peas in the front premises.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
17  For such reasons, I was very glad when ten o'clock came and we started for Miss Havisham's; though I was not at all at my ease regarding the manner in which I should acquit myself under that lady's roof.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
18  It was when I stood before her, avoiding her eyes, that I took note of the surrounding objects in detail, and saw that her watch had stopped at twenty minutes to nine, and that a clock in the room had stopped at twenty minutes to nine.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
19  When I and my friends repaired to him at six o'clock next day, he seemed to have been engaged on a case of a darker complexion than usual, for we found him with his head butted into this closet, not only washing his hands, but laving his face and gargling his throat.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
20  As I never assisted at any other representation of George Barnwell, I don't know how long it may usually take; but I know very well that it took until half-past nine o clock that night, and that when Mr. Wopsle got into Newgate, I thought he never would go to the scaffold, he became so much slower than at any former period of his disgraceful career.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XV