CLOTHES in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - clothes in Great Expectations
1  My clothes were rather a disappointment, of course.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
2  First," said Mr. Jaggers, "you should have some new clothes to come in, and they should not be working-clothes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
3  On this last evening, I dressed my self out in my new clothes for their delight, and sat in my splendor until bedtime.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
4  Probably every new and eagerly expected garment ever put on since clothes came in, fell a trifle short of the wearer's expectation.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
5  I mentioned to Mr. Pumblechook that I wished to have my new clothes sent to his house, and he was ecstatic on my so distinguishing him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
6  It was a trial to my feelings, on the next day but one, to see Joe arraying himself in his Sunday clothes to accompany me to Miss Havisham's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIII
7  So, Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday, passed; and on Friday morning I went to Mr. Pumblechook's, to put on my new clothes and pay my visit to Miss Havisham.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
8  I am going up to my guardian in London," said I, casually drawing some guineas out of my pocket and looking at them; "and I want a fashionable suit of clothes to go in.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
9  In his working-clothes, Joe was a well-knit characteristic-looking blacksmith; in his holiday clothes, he was more like a scarecrow in good circumstances, than anything else.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
10  Even when I was taken to have a new suit of clothes, the tailor had orders to make them like a kind of Reformatory, and on no account to let me have the free use of my limbs.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
11  That I could have been at our old church in my old church-going clothes, on the very last Sunday that ever was, seemed a combination of impossibilities, geographical and social, solar and lunar.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
12  I have been thinking, Joe, that when I go down town on Monday, and order my new clothes, I shall tell the tailor that I'll come and put them on there, or that I'll have them sent to Mr. Pumblechook's.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
13  Whether Mr. Trabb's local work would have sat more gracefully on him than on me, may be a question; but I am conscious that he carried off his rather old clothes much better than I carried off my new suit.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
14  A boy may lock his door, may be warm in bed, may tuck himself up, may draw the clothes over his head, may think himself comfortable and safe, but that young man will softly creep and creep his way to him and tear him open.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
15  So, Mr. Trabb measured and calculated me in the parlor, as if I were an estate and he the finest species of surveyor, and gave himself such a world of trouble that I felt that no suit of clothes could possibly remunerate him for his pains.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
16  Putting on the best clothes I had, I went into town as early as I could hope to find the shops open, and presented myself before Mr. Trabb, the tailor, who was having his breakfast in the parlor behind his shop, and who did not think it worth his while to come out to me, but called me in to him.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
17  When Herbert came, we went and had lunch at a celebrated house which I then quite venerated, but now believe to have been the most abject superstition in Europe, and where I could not help noticing, even then, that there was much more gravy on the tablecloths and knives and waiters' clothes, than in the steaks.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.