CLOTHES in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from House of Mirth by Edith Wharton
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 Current Search - clothes in House of Mirth
1  I don't realize that YOU are put to any expense except for your clothes and your railway fares.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 15
2  Mr. Bry, a short pale man, with a business face and leisure clothes, met the dilemma hilariously.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 1
3  If I were shabby no one would have me: a woman is asked out as much for her clothes as for herself.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 1
4  The clothes are the background, the frame, if you like: they don't make success, but they are a part of it.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 1
5  Her grey hair was arranged with precision, and her clothes looked excessively new and yet slightly old-fashioned.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 9
6  He discovered Trenor, in his day clothes, sitting, with a tall glass at his elbow, behind the folds of a sporting journal.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14
7  Not a shade of difference between this year and last, except that the women have got new clothes and the singers haven't got new voices.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 10
8  As she did so, the woman paused in her work and looked up curiously, resting her clenched red fists on the wet cloth she had just drawn from her pail.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 1
9  The company, in obedience to the decorative instinct which calls for fine clothes in fine surroundings, had dressed rather with an eye to Mrs. Bry's background than to herself.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 12
10  Another aspect of the same idea had presented itself to her, and she felt that it was beneath her dignity to have her nerves racked by a dependent relative who wore her old clothes.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 11
11  He was a plump rosy man of the blond Jewish type, with smart London clothes fitting him like upholstery, and small sidelong eyes which gave him the air of appraising people as if they were bric-a-brac.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 1
12  She cried quietly as she undressed, laying aside her clothes with her habitual precision, setting everything in order for the next day, when the old life must be taken up as though there had been no break in its routine.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 14
13  In the care of such a guardian, it soon became clear to Lily that she was to enjoy only the material advantages of good food and expensive clothing; and, though far from underrating these, she would gladly have exchanged them for what Mrs. Bart had taught her to regard as opportunities.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 3
14  Certainly no one need have confessed such acquiescence in her lot as was revealed in the "useful" colour of Gerty Farish's gown and the subdued lines of her hat: it is almost as stupid to let your clothes betray that you know you are ugly as to have them proclaim that you think you are beautiful.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 8
15  Their own faces were sallow with the unwholesomeness of hot air and sedentary toil, rather than with any actual signs of want: they were employed in a fashionable millinery establishment, and were fairly well clothed and well paid; but the youngest among them was as dull and colourless as the middle-aged.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 2: Chapter 10
16  He knew only that he had never seen Lily look smarter in her life, that there wasn't a woman in the house who showed off good clothes as she did, and that hitherto he, to whom she owed the opportunity of making this display, had reaped no return beyond that of gazing at her in company with several hundred other pairs of eyes.
House of Mirth By Edith Wharton
Get Context   In BOOK 1: Chapter 10