COURSE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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 Current Search - course in The Great Gatsby
1  "Of course it wouldn't," agreed Tom.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 7
2  "Of course you will," confirmed Daisy.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 1
3  Yes," he said after a moment, "but of course I'll say I was.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 7
4  Of course I knew what they were referring to, but I wasn't even vaguely engaged.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 1
5  Of course we was broke up when he run off from home but I see now there was a reason for it.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 9
6  A small gust of wind that scarcely corrugated the surface was enough to disturb its accidental course with its accidental burden.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 8
7  Sometimes in the course of gay parties women used to rub champagne into his hair; for himself he formed the habit of letting liquor alone.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  She had drunk a quantity of champagne and during the course of her song she had decided ineptly that everything was very very sad--she was not only singing, she was weeping too.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
9  I noticed that she wore her evening dress, all her dresses, like sports clothes--there was a jauntiness about her movements as if she had first learned to walk upon golf courses on clean, crisp mornings.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
10  The tears coursed down her cheeks--not freely, however, for when they came into contact with her heavily beaded eyelashes they assumed an inky color, and pursued the rest of their way in slow black rivulets.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
11  The prolonged and tumultuous argument that ended by herding us into that room eludes me, though I have a sharp physical memory that, in the course of it, my underwear kept climbing like a damp snake around my legs and intermittent beads of sweat raced cool across my back.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 7