DAY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - day in A Christmas Carol
1  But I suppose you must have the whole day.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
2  "I don't know what day of the month it is," said Scrooge.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 5 THE END OF IT
3  It's just as likely as not," said Bob, "one of these days; though there's plenty of time for that, my dear.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
4  Why, it isn't possible," said Scrooge, "that I can have slept through a whole day and far into another night.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
5  Once upon a time--of all the good days in the year, on Christmas Eve--old Scrooge sat busy in his counting-house.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
6  The darkness and the mist had vanished with it, for it was a clear, cold, winter day, with the snow upon the ground.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
7  And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
8  This was a great relief, because "Three days after sight of this First of Exchange pay to Mr. Ebenezer Scrooge or his order," and so forth, would have become a mere United States security if there were no days to count by.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
9  He looked about in that very place for his own image, but another man stood in his accustomed corner, and, though the clock pointed to his usual time of day for being there, he saw no likeness of himself among the multitudes that poured in through the Porch.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
10  All he could make out was, that it was still very foggy and extremely cold, and that there was no noise of people running to and fro, and making a great stir, as there unquestionably would have been if night had beaten off bright day, and taken possession of the world.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
11  Bob told them of the extraordinary kindness of Mr. Scrooge's nephew, whom he had scarcely seen but once, and who, meeting him in the street that day, and seeing that he looked a little--"just a little down, you know," said Bob, inquired what had happened to distress him.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 4 THE LAST OF THE SPIRITS
12  And being, from the emotion he had undergone, or the fatigues of the day, or his glimpse of the Invisible World, or the dull conversation of the Ghost, or the lateness of the hour, much in need of repose, went straight to bed without undressing, and fell asleep upon the instant.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
13  And every man on board, waking or sleeping, good or bad, had had a kinder word for one another on that day than on any day in the year; and had shared to some extent in its festivities; and had remembered those he cared for at a distance, and had known that they delighted to remember him.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
14  Gentlemen of the free-and-easy sort, who plume themselves on being acquainted with a move or two, and being usually equal to the time of day, express the wide range of their capacity for adventure by observing that they are good for anything from pitch-and-toss to manslaughter; between which opposite extremes, no doubt, there lies a tolerably wide and comprehensive range of subjects.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS