DEAD in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - dead in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1  Huckleberry Finn was there, with his dead cat.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
2  She's a goner, just as dead sure as Muff Potter's a goner.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
3  During two long weeks Tom lay a prisoner, dead to the world and its happenings.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII
4  The hooting of a distant owl was all the sound that troubled the dead stillness.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
5  And God forgive me, I cracked Tom's head with my thimble, poor boy, poor dead boy.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XV
6  Then they piled on great dead boughs till they had a roaring furnace, and were gladhearted once more.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
7  A faint wind moaned through the trees, and Tom feared it might be the spirits of the dead, complaining at being disturbed.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX
8  By this time the whole church was red-faced and suffocating with suppressed laughter, and the sermon had come to a dead standstill.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER V
9  It seemed to Tom that his schoolmates never would get done holding inquests on dead cats, and thus keeping his trouble present to his mind.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
10  A tumblebug came next, heaving sturdily at its ball, and Tom touched the creature, to see it shut its legs against its body and pretend to be dead.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
11  And now at this moment, when hope was dead, Tom Sawyer came forward with nine yellow tickets, nine red tickets, and ten blue ones, and demanded a Bible.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER IV
12  The boys huddled themselves together and sought the friendly companionship of the fire, though the dull dead heat of the breathless atmosphere was stifling.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVI
13  While one boy was worrying the tick with absorbing interest, the other would look on with interest as strong, the two heads bowed together over the slate, and the two souls dead to all things else.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII
14  He moped to school gloomy and sad, and took his flogging, along with Joe Harper, for playing hookey the day before, with the air of one whose heart was busy with heavier woes and wholly dead to trifles.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER X
15  Now a procession of ants appeared, from nowhere in particular, and went about their labors; one struggled manfully by with a dead spider five times as big as itself in its arms, and lugged it straight up a tree-trunk.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
16  Then the dead were counted, prisoners exchanged, the terms of the next disagreement agreed upon, and the day for the necessary battle appointed; after which the armies fell into line and marched away, and Tom turned homeward alone.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
17  There was not even a zephyr stirring; the dead noonday heat had even stilled the songs of the birds; nature lay in a trance that was broken by no sound but the occasional far-off hammering of a wood-pecker, and this seemed to render the pervading silence and sense of loneliness the more profound.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
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