DEATH in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain
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 Current Search - death in The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
1  The poor unfortunate had starved to death.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXIII
2  He heard no noise on board, for the young people were as subdued and still as people usually are who are nearly tired to death.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIX
3  As the two boys walked sorrowing along, they made a new compact to stand by each other and be brothers and never separate till death relieved them of their troubles.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
4  He pictured himself lying sick unto death and his aunt bending over him beseeching one little forgiving word, but he would turn his face to the wall, and die with that word unsaid.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER III
5  She said it was the last relic she should ever have of her child; and that no other memorial of her could ever be so precious, because this one parted latest from the living body before the awful death came.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXX
6  Tom Sawyer stepped forward with conceited confidence and soared into the unquenchable and indestructible "Give me liberty or give me death" speech, with fine fury and frantic gesticulation, and broke down in the middle of it.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXI
7  The Black Avenger stood still with folded arms, "looking his last" upon the scene of his former joys and his later sufferings, and wishing "she" could see him now, abroad on the wild sea, facing peril and death with dauntless heart, going to his doom with a grim smile on his lips.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIII
8  By-and-by, fatigue began to assert its claims; the children tried to pay attention, for it was dreadful to think of sitting down when time was grown to be so precious, moving, in some direction, in any direction, was at least progress and might bear fruit; but to sit down was to invite death and shorten its pursuit.
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer By Mark Twain
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXXI