DEATH in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from War and Peace(V1) by Leo Tolstoy
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 Current Search - death in War and Peace(V1)
1  From the death of Count Bezukhov he did not let go his hold of the lad.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER I
2  So remember, these are my memoirs; hand them to the Emperor after my death.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXVIII
3  "Yes, he has a right to speak so calmly of those men's death," thought Bolkonski.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIII
4  The latter spared him, and this magnanimity Bonaparte subsequently repaid by death.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III
5  The news of Count Bezukhov's death reached us before your letter and my father was much affected by it.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXV
6  I am very glad you have brought good news, though Schmidt's death is a heavy price to pay for the victory.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER IX
7  On waking in the morning she told the Rostovs and all her acquaintances the details of Count Bezukhov's death.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIV
8  His head was burning, he felt himself bleeding to death, and he saw above him the remote, lofty, and everlasting sky.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIX
9  "Move on a hundred yards and we are certainly saved, remain here another two minutes and it is certain death," thought each one.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XVIII
10  And the fear of death and of the stretchers, and love of the sun and of life, all merged into one feeling of sickening agitation.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII
11  One step beyond that boundary line which resembles the line dividing the living from the dead lies uncertainty, suffering, and death.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII
12  This head, with its remarkably broad brow and cheekbones, its handsome, sensual mouth, and its cold, majestic expression, was not disfigured by the approach of death.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XXIII
13  No, friend," said a pleasant and, as it seemed to Prince Andrew, a familiar voice, "what I say is that if it were possible to know what is beyond death, none of us would be afraid of it.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI
14  Everything seemed so futile and insignificant in comparison with the stern and solemn train of thought that weakness from loss of blood, suffering, and the nearness of death aroused in him.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIX
15  You fear and yet long to cross that line, and know that sooner or later it must be crossed and you will have to find out what is there, just as you will inevitably have to learn what lies the other side of death.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VIII
16  Toward morning all these dreams melted and merged into the chaos and darkness of unconciousness and oblivion which in the opinion of Napoleon's doctor, Larrey, was much more likely to end in death than in convalescence.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIX
17  And suddenly, at this thought of death, a whole series of most distant, most intimate, memories rose in his imagination: he remembered his last parting from his father and his wife; he remembered the days when he first loved her.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII
18  Looking into Napoleon's eyes Prince Andrew thought of the insignificance of greatness, the unimportance of life which no one could understand, and the still greater unimportance of death, the meaning of which no one alive could understand or explain.
War and Peace(V1) By Leo Tolstoy
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XIX