DESCRIBED in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - described in Pride and Prejudice
1  I described, and enforced them earnestly.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 35
2  The first part of Mrs. Gardiner's business on her arrival was to distribute her presents and describe the newest fashions.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 25
3  They could describe an entertainment with accuracy, relate an anecdote with humour, and laugh at their acquaintance with spirit.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
4  The rapture of Lydia on this occasion, her adoration of Mrs. Forster, the delight of Mrs. Bennet, and the mortification of Kitty, are scarcely to be described.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 41
5  Lakes, mountains, and rivers shall not be jumbled together in our imaginations; nor when we attempt to describe any particular scene, will we begin quarreling about its relative situation.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 27
6  You will find her manners beyond anything I can describe; and your wit and vivacity, I think, must be acceptable to her, especially when tempered with the silence and respect which her rank will inevitably excite.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 19
7  In vain did Elizabeth endeavour to check the rapidity of her mother's words, or persuade her to describe her felicity in a less audible whisper; for, to her inexpressible vexation, she could perceive that the chief of it was overheard by Mr. Darcy, who sat opposite to them.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
8  She tried to recollect some instance of goodness, some distinguished trait of integrity or benevolence, that might rescue him from the attacks of Mr. Darcy; or at least, by the predominance of virtue, atone for those casual errors under which she would endeavour to class what Mr. Darcy had described as the idleness and vice of many years' continuance.
Pride and Prejudice By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 36