DESIRE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - desire in The Aeneid
1  Here is my desire; this is my native country.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
2  To us also in our desire time bore a god's aid and arrival.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
3  Nor have I any hope more of seeing my old home nor my sweet children and the father whom I desire.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
4  Lo, discord is ripened at thy desire into baleful war: tell them now to mix in amity and join alliance.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
5  I stood amazed; and my heart kindled with marvellous desire to accost him and learn of so strange a fortune.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
6  Aeolus thus returned: 'Thine, O queen, the task to search whereto thou hast desire; for me it is right to do thy bidding.'
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
7  Only let Aeneas himself come hither, if desire of us be so strong, if he be in haste to join our friendship and be called our ally.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
8  Hence is it they fear and desire, sorrow and rejoice; nor can they pierce the air while barred in the blind darkness of their prison-house.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
9  But him Orestes, aflame with passionate desire for his stolen bride, and driven by the furies of crime, catches unguarded and murders at his ancestral altars.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
10  Yet if thy desire be such to know our calamities, and briefly to hear Troy's last agony, though my spirit shudders at the remembrance and recoils in pain, I will essay.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
11  Here with seven sail gathered of all his company Aeneas enters; and disembarking on the land of their desire the Trojans gain the chosen beach, and set their feet dripping with brine upon the shore.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
12  Then the seed of Anchises commands an hundred envoys chosen of every degree to go to the stately royal city, all with the wreathed boughs of Pallas, to bear him gifts and desire grace for the Teucrians.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
13  First they visit the shrines, and desire grace from altar to altar; they sacrifice sheep fitly chosen to Ceres the Lawgiver, to Phoebus and lord Lyaeus, to Juno before all, guardian of the marriage bond.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
14  And now, when I have reached the courts of my ancestral dwelling, our home of old, my father, whom it was my first desire to carry high into the hills, and whom first I sought, declines, now Troy is rooted out, to prolong his life through the pains of exile.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
15  He too sat there, with the divining-rod of Quirinus, girt in the short augural gown, and carrying on his left arm the sacred shield, Picus the tamer of horses; he whom Circe, desperate with amorous desire, smote with her golden rod and turned by her poisons into a bird with patches of colour on his wings.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
16  After hunger is driven away and the desire of food stayed, King Evander speaks: 'No idle superstition that knows not the gods of old hath ordered these our solemn rites, this customary feast, this altar of august sanctity; saved from bitter perils, O Trojan guest, do we worship, and most due are the rites we inaugurate.'
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK EIGHTH
17  Seeing them close-ranked and daring for battle, I therewith began thus: "Men, hearts of supreme and useless bravery, if your desire be fixed to follow one who dares the utmost; you see what is the fortune of our state: all the gods by whom this empire was upheld have gone forth, abandoning shrine and altar; your aid comes to a burning city."
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.