DESIRE in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - desire in Les Misérables
1  desire on the subject of the Faux family.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IX—THE BROTHER AS DEPICTED BY THE SISTER
2  My principal object is to satisfi the desire which progressively.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER III—QUADRIFRONS
3  The last thing that owls desire is to have a candle brought to them.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER X—WHICH EXPLAINS HOW JAVERT GOT ON THE SCENT
4  the dedication of my drama which I desire to make to you and of all.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER III—QUADRIFRONS
5  heart will melt at this statement and the desire will subjugate you.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER IV—A ROSE IN MISERY
6  The cause of all this youth's crimes was the desire to be well-dressed.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—BABET, GUEULEMER, CLAQUESOUS, AND ...
7  This march savored of an attack, and certainly of a desire for conquest.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER IV—BEGINNING OF A GREAT MALADY
8  The little beauty inspired a desire to take a bite from the apples of her cheeks.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—ONE MOTHER MEETS ANOTHER MOTHER
9  These epochs are peculiar and mislead the politicians who desire to convert them to profit.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
10  But through a desire to sit down too soon, one may arrest the very march of the human race.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER II—BADLY SEWED
11  Mr. Mayor, I do not desire that you should treat me kindly; your kindness roused sufficient bad blood in me when it was directed to others.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER II—HOW JEAN MAY BECOME CHAMP
12  This old faubourg, peopled like an ant-hill, laborious, courageous, and angry as a hive of bees, was quivering with expectation and with the desire for a tumult.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V—FACTS WHENCE HISTORY SPRINGS AND WHICH HISTORY ...
13  Now, these parents groan, these old folks implore us, these good men and these good women call us prodigal sons; they desire our return, and offer to kill calves for us.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IX—A MERRY END TO MIRTH
14  Whatever may have been his desire to remain where he was, he could not halt there, he was irresistibly constrained to continue, to advance, to examine, to think, to march further.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER VI—RES ANGUSTA
15  But that a man with such a hat should permit himself such a desire, and that a man with such a coat should permit himself to have a will, was something which Madame Thenardier did not intend to tolerate.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VIII—THE UNPLEASANTNESS OF RECEIVING INTO ONE'S ...
16  There are rough outlines in nature; there are, in creation, ready-made parodies; a beak which is not a beak, wings which are not wings, gills which are not gills, paws which are not paws, a cry of pain which arouses a desire to laugh, there is the duck.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER III—MARIUS' ASTONISHMENTS
17  A saint who dwells in a paroxysm of abnegation is a dangerous neighbor; he might communicate to you, by contagion, an incurable poverty, an anchylosis of the joints, which are useful in advancement, and in short, more renunciation than you desire; and this infectious virtue is avoided.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER XII—THE SOLITUDE OF MONSEIGNEUR WELCOME
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.