DESIRE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - desire in Moby Dick
1  Upon this the captain started, and eagerly desired to know more.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 91. The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud.
2  Like cures like; and for this hunt, my malady becomes my most desired health.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 129. The Cabin.
3  "All 'dention," said Fleece, again stooping over upon his tongs in the desired position.'
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 64. Stubb's Supper.
4  He made no advances whatever; appeared to have no desire to enlarge the circle of his acquaintances.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10. A Bosom Friend.
5  Therefore he had not solicited a boat's crew from them, nor had he in any way hinted his desires on that head.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 50. Ahab's Boat and Crew. Fedallah.
6  He desires to paint you the dreamiest, shadiest, quietest, most enchanting bit of romantic landscape in all the valley of the Saco.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 1. Loomings.
7  Struck by his desperate dauntlessness, and his wild desire to visit Christendom, the captain at last relented, and told him he might make himself at home.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. Biographical.
8  At length the desired observation was taken; and with his pencil upon his ivory leg, Ahab soon calculated what his latitude must be at that precise instant.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 118. The Quadrant.
9  For though it was a most unwonted hour, yet so impressive was the cry, and so deliriously exciting, that almost every soul on board instinctively desired a lowering.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 51. The Spirit-Spout.
10  "All 'dention," said the old black, with both hands placed as desired, vainly wriggling his grizzled head, as if to get both ears in front at one and the same time.'
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 64. Stubb's Supper.
11  So that to this hunter's wondrous skill, the proverbial evanescence of a thing writ in water, a wake, is to all desired purposes well nigh as reliable as the steadfast land.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 134. The Chase—Second Day.
12  He desired that ship to unite with his own in the search; by sailing over the sea some four or five miles apart, on parallel lines, and so sweeping a double horizon, as it were.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 128. The Pequod Meets The Rachel.
13  In the name of all us Limeese, I but desire to express to you, sir sailor, that we have by no means overlooked your delicacy in not substituting present Lima for distant Venice in your corrupt comparison.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
14  Nor did I at all object to the hint from Queequeg that perhaps it were best to strike a light, seeing that we were so wide awake; and besides he felt a strong desire to have a few quiet puffs from his Tomahawk.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11. Nightgown.
15  No: he desired a canoe like those of Nantucket, all the more congenial to him, being a whaleman, that like a whale-boat these coffin-canoes were without a keel; though that involved but uncertain steering, and much lee-way adown the dim ages.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 110. Queequeg in His Coffin.
16  When a new-hatched savage running wild about his native woodlands in a grass clout, followed by the nibbling goats, as if he were a green sapling; even then, in Queequeg's ambitious soul, lurked a strong desire to see something more of Christendom than a specimen whaler or two.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 12. Biographical.
17  Besides, it was very convenient on an excursion; much better than those garden-chairs which are convertible into walking-sticks; upon occasion, a chief calling his attendant, and desiring him to make a settee of himself under a spreading tree, perhaps in some damp marshy place.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 21. Going Aboard.
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