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Quotes of DIET from The Narrative of the Life by Frederick Douglass

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The men and women slaves received, as their monthly allowance of food, eight pounds of pork, or its equivalent in fish, and one bushel of corn meal.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER II   Context
Few are willing to incur the odium attaching to the reputation of being a cruel master; and above all things, they would not be known as not giving a slave enough to eat.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER VI   Context
Every city slaveholder is anxious to have it known of him, that he feeds his slaves well; and it is due to them to say, that most of them do give their slaves enough to eat.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER VI   Context
Not to give a slave enough to eat, is regarded as the most aggravated development of meanness even among slaveholders.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER IX   Context
My reason for this kind of carelessness, or carefulness, was, that I could always get something to eat when I went there.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER IX   Context
I nevertheless made the change gladly; for I was sure of getting enough to eat, which is not the smallest consideration to a hungry man.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER IX   Context
He finally gave up the chase, thinking, I suppose, that I must come home for something to eat; he would give himself no further trouble in looking for me.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER X   Context
His master, in many cases, goes off to town, and buys a large quantity; he returns, takes his whip, and commands the slave to eat the molasses, until the poor fellow is made sick at the very mention of it.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER X   Context
His master is enraged at him; but, not willing to send him off without food, gives him more than is necessary, and compels him to eat it within a given time.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER X   Context
Here, too, the slaves of all the other farms received their monthly allowance of food, and their yearly clothing.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER II   Context
The men and women slaves received, as their monthly allowance of food, eight pounds of pork, or its equivalent in fish, and one bushel of corn meal.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER II   Context
The same mode is sometimes adopted to make the slaves refrain from asking for more food than their regular allowance.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER X   Context
His master is enraged at him; but, not willing to send him off without food, gives him more than is necessary, and compels him to eat it within a given time.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life, CHAPTER X   Context
The men and women slaves received, as their monthly allowance of food, eight pounds of pork, or its equivalent in fish, and one bushel of corn meal.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER II   Context
Few are willing to incur the odium attaching to the reputation of being a cruel master; and above all things, they would not be known as not giving a slave enough to eat.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER VI   Context
Every city slaveholder is anxious to have it known of him, that he feeds his slaves well; and it is due to them to say, that most of them do give their slaves enough to eat.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER VI   Context
Not to give a slave enough to eat, is regarded as the most aggravated development of meanness even among slaveholders.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER IX   Context
My reason for this kind of carelessness, or carefulness, was, that I could always get something to eat when I went there.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER IX   Context
I nevertheless made the change gladly; for I was sure of getting enough to eat, which is not the smallest consideration to a hungry man.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER IX   Context
He finally gave up the chase, thinking, I suppose, that I must come home for something to eat; he would give himself no further trouble in looking for me.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER X   Context
His master, in many cases, goes off to town, and buys a large quantity; he returns, takes his whip, and commands the slave to eat the molasses, until the poor fellow is made sick at the very mention of it.
Frederick Douglass
The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, CHAPTER X   Context
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