DINING in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - dining in Great Expectations
1  I found Herbert dining on cold meat, and delighted to welcome me back.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
2  My inn had once been a part of an ancient ecclesiastical house, and I dined in a little octagonal common-room, like a font.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LII
3  He was altogether too unsettled in his mind over it, to appreciate it comfortably I thought, or to have anybody to dine with him, without making a chop with his jaws at the visitor.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter III
4  We dined very well, and were waited on by a maid-servant whom I had never seen in all my comings and goings, but who, for anything I know, had been in that mysterious house the whole time.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
5  We dined on these occasions in the kitchen, and adjourned, for the nuts and oranges and apples to the parlor; which was a change very like Joe's change from his working-clothes to his Sunday dress.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
6  Soon afterwards, Biddy, Joe, and I, had a cold dinner together; but we dined in the best parlor, not in the old kitchen, and Joe was so exceedingly particular what he did with his knife and fork and the saltcellar and what not, that there was great restraint upon us.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXV
7  I had again left my boat at the wharf below Bridge; the time was an hour earlier in the afternoon; and, undecided where to dine, I had strolled up into Cheapside, and was strolling along it, surely the most unsettled person in all the busy concourse, when a large hand was laid upon my shoulder by some one overtaking me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
8  At Startop's suggestion, we put ourselves down for election into a club called The Finches of the Grove: the object of which institution I have never divined, if it were not that the members should dine expensively once a fortnight, to quarrel among themselves as much as possible after dinner, and to cause six waiters to get drunk on the stairs.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV