DINNER in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Persuasion by Jane Austen
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 Current Search - dinner in Persuasion
1  She had promised to be with the Musgroves from breakfast to dinner.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 23
2  Her making a fourth, when they sat down to dinner, was noticed as an advantage.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
3  Your father might have asked us to dinner, I think, if he had wanted to see us.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
4  We have had a very dull Christmas; Mr and Mrs Musgrove have not had one dinner party all the holidays.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 18
5  They were, consequently, to stay the night there, and not to be expected back till the next day's dinner.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
6  One always knows beforehand what the dinner will be, and who will be there; and it is so very uncomfortable not having a carriage of one's own.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 5
7  After securing accommodations, and ordering a dinner at one of the inns, the next thing to be done was unquestionably to walk directly down to the sea.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
8  A dinner at Mr Musgrove's had been the occasion when all these things should have been seen by Anne; but she had staid at home, under the mixed plea of a headache of her own, and some return of indisposition in little Charles.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
9  One morning, very soon after the dinner at the Musgroves, at which Anne had not been present, Captain Wentworth walked into the drawing-room at the Cottage, where were only herself and the little invalid Charles, who was lying on the sofa.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 9
10  He had even refused one regular invitation to dinner; and having been found on the occasion by Mr Musgrove with some large books before him, Mr and Mrs Musgrove were sure all could not be right, and talked, with grave faces, of his studying himself to death.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 10
11  The dinner, already ordered at the inn, was at last, though unwillingly, accepted as a excuse; but they seemed almost hurt that Captain Wentworth should have brought any such party to Lyme, without considering it as a thing of course that they should dine with them.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
12  She felt that Mrs Musgrove and all her party ought to be asked to dine with them; but she could not bear to have the difference of style, the reduction of servants, which a dinner must betray, witnessed by those who had been always so inferior to the Elliots of Kellynch.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
13  Mr Elliot had called repeatedly, had dined with them once, evidently delighted by the distinction of being asked, for they gave no dinners in general; delighted, in short, by every proof of cousinly notice, and placing his whole happiness in being on intimate terms in Camden Place.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 15
14  These were her internal persuasions: "Old fashioned notions; country hospitality; we do not profess to give dinners; few people in Bath do; Lady Alicia never does; did not even ask her own sister's family, though they were here a month: and I dare say it would be very inconvenient to Mrs Musgrove; put her quite out of her way."
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 22
15  There was so much attachment to Captain Wentworth in all this, and such a bewitching charm in a degree of hospitality so uncommon, so unlike the usual style of give-and-take invitations, and dinners of formality and display, that Anne felt her spirits not likely to be benefited by an increasing acquaintance among his brother-officers.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 11
16  Mrs Musgrove had got Mrs Harville's children away as much as she could, every possible supply from Uppercross had been furnished, to lighten the inconvenience to the Harvilles, while the Harvilles had been wanting them to come to dinner every day; and in short, it seemed to have been only a struggle on each side as to which should be most disinterested and hospitable.
Persuasion By Jane Austen
Get Context   In Chapter 14