DOORS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - doors in A Christmas Carol
1  There was a boy singing a Christmas Carol at my door last night.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
2  There it stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door: Scrooge and Marley.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
3  Scrooge closed the window, and examined the door by which the Ghost had entered.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
4  They went, the Ghost and Scrooge, across the hall, to a door at the back of the house.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
5  But, before he shut his heavy door, he walked through his rooms to see that all was right.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
6  Scrooge looked at the Ghost, and, with a mournful shaking of his head, glanced anxiously towards the door.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
7  Quite satisfied, he closed his door, and locked himself in; double locked himself in, which was not his custom.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
8  He fastened the door, and walked across the hall, and up the stairs: slowly, too: trimming his candle as he went.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
9  Now, it is a fact that there was nothing at all particular about the knocker on the door, except that it was very large.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
10  His colour changed, though, when, without a pause, it came on through the heavy door, and passed into the room before his eyes.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
11  He stopped at the outer door to bestow the greetings of the season on the clerk, who, cold as he was, was warmer than Scrooge; for he returned them cordially.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
12  The door of Scrooge's counting-house was open, that he might keep his eye upon his clerk, who in a dismal little cell beyond, a sort of tank, was copying letters.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
13  The cellar door flew open with a booming sound, and then he heard the noise much louder on the floors below; then coming up the stairs; then coming straight towards his door.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
14  Nor was it more retentive of its ancient state within; for, entering the dreary hall, and glancing through the open doors of many rooms, they found them poorly furnished, cold, and vast.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 2 THE FIRST OF THE THREE SPIRITS
15  There were great, round, pot-bellied baskets of chestnuts, shaped like the waistcoats of jolly old gentlemen, lolling at the doors, and tumbling out into the street in their apoplectic opulence.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 3 THE SECOND OF THE THREE SPIRITS
16  And then let any man explain to me, if he can, how it happened that Scrooge, having his key in the lock of the door, saw in the knocker, without its undergoing any intermediate process of change--not a knocker, but Marley's face.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
17  You may talk vaguely about driving a coach and six up a good old flight of stairs, or through a bad young Act of Parliament; but I mean to say you might have got a hearse up that staircase, and taken it broadwise, with the splinter-bar towards the wall, and the door towards the balustrades: and done it easy.
A Christmas Carol By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In 1 MARLEY'S GHOST
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