DREAM in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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 Current Search - dream in Moby Dick
1  "I have dreamed it again," said he.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 117. The Whale Watch.
2  Such a queer dream, King-Post, I never had.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31. Queen Mab.
3  Tell 'em to avast dreaming of their lasses.'
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 40. Midnight, Forecastle.
4  But now comes the greatest joke of the dream, Flask.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 31. Queen Mab.
5  During all this, Queequeg lay with closed eyes, as if in a dream.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 110. Queequeg in His Coffin.
6  So in dreams, have I seen majestic Satan thrusting forth his tormented colossal claw from the flame Baltic of Hell.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 86. The Tail.
7  But I got a dreaming and sprawling about one night, and somehow, Sam got pitched on the floor, and came near breaking his arm.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
8  But while this sleep, this dream is on ye, move your foot or hand an inch; slip your hold at all; and your identity comes back in horror.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 35. The Mast-Head.
9  Such were the sounds that now came hurtling from out the old man's tormented sleep, as if Starbuck's voice had caused the long dumb dream to speak.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 123. The Musket.
10  When I was a child, I well remember a somewhat similar circumstance that befell me; whether it was a reality or a dream, I never could entirely settle.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 4. The Counterpane.
11  Where Steelkilt now is, gentlemen, none know; but upon the island of Nantucket, the widow of Radney still turns to the sea which refuses to give up its dead; still in dreams sees the awful white whale that destroyed him.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 54. The Town-Ho's Story.
12  He therefore held his peace on that head, but otherwise was quite frank and confidential with him, so that the two quickly concocted a little plan for both circumventing and satirizing the Captain, without his at all dreaming of distrusting their sincerity.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 91. The Pequod Meets The Rose-Bud.
13  But in pursuit of those far mysteries we dream of, or in tormented chase of that demon phantom that, some time or other, swims before all human hearts; while chasing such over this round globe, they either lead us on in barren mazes or midway leave us whelmed.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 52. The Albatross.
14  Some considering touch of humanity was in him; for at times like these, he usually abstained from patrolling the quarter-deck; because to his wearied mates, seeking repose within six inches of his ivory heel, such would have been the reverberating crack and din of that bony step, that their dreams would have been on the crunching teeth of sharks.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 29. Enter Ahab; to Him, Stubb.
15  And meet it is, that over these sea-pastures, wide-rolling watery prairies and Potters' Fields of all four continents, the waves should rise and fall, and ebb and flow unceasingly; for here, millions of mixed shades and shadows, drowned dreams, somnambulisms, reveries; all that we call lives and souls, lie dreaming, dreaming, still; tossing like slumberers in their beds; the ever-rolling waves but made so by their restlessness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 111. The Pacific.
16  And meet it is, that over these sea-pastures, wide-rolling watery prairies and Potters' Fields of all four continents, the waves should rise and fall, and ebb and flow unceasingly; for here, millions of mixed shades and shadows, drowned dreams, somnambulisms, reveries; all that we call lives and souls, lie dreaming, dreaming, still; tossing like slumberers in their beds; the ever-rolling waves but made so by their restlessness.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 111. The Pacific.