DRESS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - dress in Great Expectations
1  They wore the dress that I likewise knew well.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
2  Dresses, less splendid than the dress she wore, and half-packed trunks, were scattered about.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
3  I started much more naturally then, to find myself confronted by a man in a sober gray dress.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
4  Mr. Pumblechook's own room was given up to me to dress in, and was decorated with clean towels expressly for the event.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIX
5  The Matthew whose place was to be at Miss Havisham's head, when she lay dead, in her bride's dress on the bride's table.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XVIII
6  You won't find half so much fault in me if you think of me in my forge dress, with my hammer in my hand, or even my pipe.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
7  The fashion of his dress could no more come in its way when he spoke these words than it could come in its way in Heaven.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVII
8  So she sat, corpse-like, as we played at cards; the frillings and trimmings on her bridal dress, looking like earthy paper.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
9  She was in her chair near the old table, in the old dress, with her two hands crossed on her stick, her chin resting on them, and her eyes on the fire.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
10  I saw that the dress had been put upon the rounded figure of a young woman, and that the figure upon which it now hung loose had shrunk to skin and bone.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  Before she spoke again, she turned her eyes from me, and looked at the dress she wore, and at the dressing-table, and finally at herself in the looking-glass.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
12  I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
13  Once, I had been taken to one of our old marsh churches to see a skeleton in the ashes of a rich dress that had been dug out of a vault under the church pavement.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
14  We dined on these occasions in the kitchen, and adjourned, for the nuts and oranges and apples to the parlor; which was a change very like Joe's change from his working-clothes to his Sunday dress.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
15  Without this arrest of everything, this standing still of all the pale decayed objects, not even the withered bridal dress on the collapsed form could have looked so like grave-clothes, or the long veil so like a shroud.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
16  She held the head of her stick against her heart as she stood looking at the table; she in her once white dress, all yellow and withered; the once white cloth all yellow and withered; everything around in a state to crumble under a touch.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
17  A figure all in yellow white, with but one shoe to the feet; and it hung so, that I could see that the faded trimmings of the dress were like earthy paper, and that the face was Miss Havisham's, with a movement going over the whole countenance as if she were trying to call to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
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