DRINK in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - drink in A Tale of Two Cities
1  Those were drinking days, and most men drank hard.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER V. The Jackal
2  For the first time in many years, he had no strong drink.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER XII. Darkness
3  The last of the three now said his say, as he put down his empty drinking vessel and smacked his lips.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
4  All the people within reach had suspended their business, or their idleness, to run to the spot and drink the wine.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
5  But, he feigned not to notice the two strangers, and fell into discourse with the triumvirate of customers who were drinking at the counter.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
6  On hearing footsteps close at hand, these three turned, and rose, and showed themselves to be the three of one name who had been drinking in the wine-shop.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
7  The people rudely pictured as drinking in the wine-shops, croaked over their scanty measures of thin wine and beer, and were gloweringly confidential together.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
8  When he stopped for drink, he moved this muffler with his left hand, only while he poured his liquor in with his right; as soon as that was done, he muffled again.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
9  The messenger rode back at an easy trot, stopping pretty often at ale-houses by the way to drink, but evincing a tendency to keep his own counsel, and to keep his hat cocked over his eyes.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER III. The Night Shadows
10  In the submissive way of one long accustomed to obey under coercion, he ate and drank what they gave him to eat and drink, and put on the cloak and other wrappings, that they gave him to wear.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI. The Shoemaker
11  Brief as such companionship was in every separate instance, Mr. Cruncher never failed to become so interested in the lady as to express a strong desire to have the honour of drinking her very good health.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XIV. The Honest Tradesman
12  Two men had entered separately, and had been about to order drink, when, catching sight of that novelty, they faltered, made a pretence of looking about as if for some friend who was not there, and went away.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVI. Still Knitting
13  Doctor Manette took what was given him to eat and drink, and worked on, that first day, until it was too dark to see--worked on, half an hour after Mr. Lorry could not have seen, for his life, to read or write.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XVIII. Nine Days
14  These were to the full as interested in the place, however, as if they could have commanded whole barrels of wine; and they glided from seat to seat, and from corner to corner, swallowing talk in lieu of drink, with greedy looks.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XV. Knitting
15  The mender of roads went home, with the dust going on before him according to the set of the wind, and was soon at the fountain, squeezing himself in among the lean kine brought there to drink, and appearing even to whisper to them in his whispering to all the village.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER XXIII. Fire Rises
16  There was a special companionship in it, an observable inclination on the part of every one to join some other one, which led, especially among the luckier or lighter-hearted, to frolicsome embraces, drinking of healths, shaking of hands, and even joining of hands and dancing, a dozen together.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V. The Wine-shop
17  As these ruffians turned and turned, their matted locks now flung forward over their eyes, now flung backward over their necks, some women held wine to their mouths that they might drink; and what with dropping blood, and what with dropping wine, and what with the stream of sparks struck out of the stone, all their wicked atmosphere seemed gore and fire.
A Tale of Two Cities By Charles Dickens
ContextHighlight   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER II. The Grindstone
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