EMBRACE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
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 Current Search - embrace in Jane Eyre
1  No thought could be admitted of entering to embrace her.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
2  I gladly advanced; and it was not merely a cold word now, or even a shake of the hand that I received, but an embrace and a kiss.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXIV
3  She sat down on the ground near me, embraced her knees with her arms, and rested her head upon them; in that attitude she remained silent as an Indian.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII
4  Up the blood rushed to his face; forth flashed the fire from his eyes; erect he sprang; he held his arms out; but I evaded the embrace, and at once quitted the room.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXVII
5  He said this as if he spoke to a vision, viewless to any eye but his own; then, folding his arms, which he had half extended, on his chest, he seemed to enclose in their embrace the invisible being.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIV
6  Farther off were hills: not so lofty as those round Lowood, nor so craggy, nor so like barriers of separation from the living world; but yet quiet and lonely hills enough, and seeming to embrace Thornfield with a seclusion I had not expected to find existent so near the stirring locality of Millcote.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XI
7  I shall devote myself for a time to the examination of the Roman Catholic dogmas, and to a careful study of the workings of their system: if I find it to be, as I half suspect it is, the one best calculated to ensure the doing of all things decently and in order, I shall embrace the tenets of Rome and probably take the veil.
Jane Eyre By Charlotte Bronte
Get Context   In CHAPTER XXII