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Quotes from Moby Dick by Herman Melville
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1  This arrangement of the lower end is necessary on two accounts.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 60. The Line.
2  Now and then he stooped to pick up a patch, or save an end of tarred twine, which otherwise might have been wasted.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. His Mark.
3  This fin is some three or four feet long, growing vertically from the hinder part of the back, of an angular shape, and with a very sharp pointed end.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 32. Cetology.
4  At one end a ruminating tar was still further adorning it with his jack-knife, stooping over and diligently working away at the space between his legs.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3. The Spouter-Inn.
5  But this difficulty is ingeniously overcome: a small, strong line is prepared with a wooden float at its outer end, and a weight in its middle, while the other end is secured to the ship.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 64. Stubb's Supper.
6  Both ends of the line are exposed; the lower end terminating in an eye-splice or loop coming up from the bottom against the side of the tub, and hanging over its edge completely disengaged from everything.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 60. The Line.
7  The end of the hawser-like rope winding through these intricacies, was then conducted to the windlass, and the huge lower block of the tackles was swung over the whale; to this block the great blubber hook, weighing some one hundred pounds, was attached.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 67. Cutting In.
8  He kept a whole row of pipes there ready loaded, stuck in a rack, within easy reach of his hand; and, whenever he turned in, he smoked them all out in succession, lighting one from the other to the end of the chapter; then loading them again to be in readiness anew.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 27. Knights and Squires.
9  It is a notched stick of a peculiar form, some two feet in length, which is perpendicularly inserted into the starboard gunwale near the bow, for the purpose of furnishing a rest for the wooden extremity of the harpoon, whose other naked, barbed end slopingly projects from the prow.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 63. The Crotch.
10  Why such a whale became thus marked was not altogether and originally owing to his bodily peculiarities as distinguished from other whales; for however peculiar in that respect any chance whale may be, they soon put an end to his peculiarities by killing him, and boiling him down into a peculiarly valuable oil.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 45. The Affidavit.
11  As we were walking down the end of the wharf towards the ship, Queequeg carrying his harpoon, Captain Peleg in his gruff voice loudly hailed us from his wigwam, saying he had not suspected my friend was a cannibal, and furthermore announcing that he let no cannibals on board that craft, unless they previously produced their papers.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18. His Mark.
12  In the midst of this consternation, Queequeg dropped deftly to his knees, and crawling under the path of the boom, whipped hold of a rope, secured one end to the bulwarks, and then flinging the other like a lasso, caught it round the boom as it swept over his head, and at the next jerk, the spar was that way trapped, and all was safe.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 13. Wheelbarrow.
13  For, as when the red-cheeked, dancing girls, April and May, trip home to the wintry, misanthropic woods; even the barest, ruggedest, most thunder-cloven old oak will at least send forth some few green sprouts, to welcome such glad-hearted visitants; so Ahab did, in the end, a little respond to the playful allurings of that girlish air.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 28. Ahab.
14  If such a furious trope may stand, his special lunacy stormed his general sanity, and carried it, and turned all its concentred cannon upon its own mad mark; so that far from having lost his strength, Ahab, to that one end, did now possess a thousand fold more potency than ever he had sanely brought to bear upon any one reasonable object.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
15  The rest of his body was so streaked, and spotted, and marbled with the same shrouded hue, that, in the end, he had gained his distinctive appellation of the White Whale; a name, indeed, literally justified by his vivid aspect, when seen gliding at high noon through a dark blue sea, leaving a milky-way wake of creamy foam, all spangled with golden gleamings.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
16  No wonder, then, that ever gathering volume from the mere transit over the widest watery spaces, the outblown rumors of the White Whale did in the end incorporate with themselves all manner of morbid hints, and half-formed foetal suggestions of supernatural agencies, which eventually invested Moby Dick with new terrors unborrowed from anything that visibly appears.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 41. Moby Dick.
17  More and more she leans over to the whale, while every gasping heave of the windlass is answered by a helping heave from the billows; till at last, a swift, startling snap is heard; with a great swash the ship rolls upwards and backwards from the whale, and the triumphant tackle rises into sight dragging after it the disengaged semicircular end of the first strip of blubber.
Moby Dick By Herman Melville
Get Context   In CHAPTER 67. Cutting In.
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