EQUALITY in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
Free Online Vocabulary Test
K12, SAT, GRE, IELTS, TOEFL
 Search Panel
Word:
You may input your word or phrase.
Author:
Book:
 
Stems:
If search object is a contraction or phrase, it'll be ignored.
Sort by:
Each search starts from the first page. Its result is limited to the first 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.
Common Search Words
 Current Search - equality in Les Misérables
1  This cry was uttered equally by the republicans.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER IV—CRACKS BENEATH THE FOUNDATION
2  All are bowed beneath the equality of baptismal names.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER IV—THE CONVENT FROM THE POINT OF VIEW OF ...
3  Beyond the tomb there is nothing but equal nothingness.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VIII—PHILOSOPHY AFTER DRINKING
4  The two ideas which counselled him appeared to him equally fatal.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—A TEMPEST IN A SKULL
5  When one is a veritable man, one holds equally aloof from swagger and from affected airs.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER VII—THE OLD HEART AND THE YOUNG HEART IN THE ...
6  He now recoiled in equal terror before both the resolutions at which he had arrived in turn.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—A TEMPEST IN A SKULL
7  Let us come to an understanding about equality; for, if liberty is the summit, equality is the base.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER V—THE HORIZON WHICH ONE BEHOLDS FROM THE SUMMIT ...
8  This displacement, which places the "elegant" name on the plebeian and the rustic name on the aristocrat, is nothing else than an eddy of equality.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER II—FIRST SKETCH OF TWO UNPREPOSSESSING FIGURES
9  Then she beheld a most unprecedented thing, a thing so unprecedented that nothing equal to it had appeared to her even in the blackest deliriums of fever.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 8: CHAPTER IV—AUTHORITY REASSERTS ITS RIGHTS
10  He beheld before him two paths, both equally straight, but he beheld two; and that terrified him; him, who had never in all his life known more than one straight line.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER I—JAVERT
11  These two thoughts were so closely intertwined in his mind that they formed but a single one there; both were equally absorbing and imperative and ruled his slightest actions.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—A TEMPEST IN A SKULL
12  We are equally far removed from the hosanna of Joseph de Maistre, who wound up by anointing the executioner, and from the sneer of Voltaire, who even goes so far as to ridicule the cross.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER XI—END OF THE PETIT-PICPUS
13  There was, so to speak, silence in her speech; she said just what was necessary, and she possessed a tone of voice which would have equally edified a confessional or enchanted a drawing-room.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER I—SISTER SIMPLICE
14  The cuirassiers, relatively few in number, and still further diminished by the catastrophe of the ravine, had almost the whole English army against them, but they multiplied themselves so that each man of them was equal to ten.
Les Misérables (V2) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER X—THE PLATEAU OF MONT-SAINT-JEAN
15  But when he beheld that mayor, that magistrate, calmly wipe his face and say, "Set this woman at liberty," he underwent a sort of intoxication of amazement; thought and word failed him equally; the sum total of possible astonishment had been exceeded in his case.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER XIII—THE SOLUTION OF SOME QUESTIONS CONNECTED ...
16  He asked himself whether human society could have the right to force its members to suffer equally in one case for its own unreasonable lack of foresight, and in the other case for its pitiless foresight; and to seize a poor man forever between a defect and an excess, a default of work and an excess of punishment.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII—THE INTERIOR OF DESPAIR
17  For a space of fifteen years, those great principles which are so old for the thinker, so new for the statesman, could be seen at work in perfect peace, on the public square; equality before the law, liberty of conscience, liberty of speech, liberty of the press, the accessibility of all aptitudes to all functions.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER I—WELL CUT
Your search result possibly is over 17 sentences. If you upgrade to a VIP account, you will see up to 500 sentences for one search.