ESCAPE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde
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 Current Search - escape in The Picture of Dorian Gray
1  He wanted to escape from himself.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 16
2  He, at any rate, had escaped that.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
3  I want to escape, to go away, to forget.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 18
4  It might escape the hideousness of sin, but the hideousness of age was in store for it.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 10
5  To become the spectator of one's own life, as Harry says, is to escape the suffering of life.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 9
6  They wondered how one so charming and graceful as he was could have escaped the stain of an age that was at once sordid and sensual.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
7  He played with the idea and grew wilful; tossed it into the air and transformed it; let it escape and recaptured it; made it iridescent with fancy and winged it with paradox.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3
8  For these treasures, and everything that he collected in his lovely house, were to be to him means of forgetfulness, modes by which he could escape, for a season, from the fear that seemed to him at times to be almost too great to be borne.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 11
9  Fortunately for him she had on the other side Lord Faudel, a most intelligent middle-aged mediocrity, as bald as a ministerial statement in the House of Commons, with whom she was conversing in that intensely earnest manner which is the one unpardonable error, as he remarked once himself, that all really good people fall into, and from which none of them ever quite escape.
The Picture of Dorian Gray By Oscar Wilde
Get Context   In CHAPTER 3