EXPERIENCE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Les Misérables by Victor Hugo
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 Current Search - experience in Les Misérables
1  Gavroche, with his experience of the things of this world, recognized a drunken man.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 15: CHAPTER IV—GAVROCHE'S EXCESS OF ZEAL
2  Certain success would attend the experiment of employing the city to manure the plain.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER I—THE LAND IMPOVERISHED BY THE SEA
3  They experience the quivers of a spider at the passage of a stranger or of a man from the country.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER IV—COMPOSITION OF THE TROUPE
4  The experiments on indigo had not been successful in the little garden of Austerlitz, which had a bad exposure.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER III—APPARITION TO FATHER MABEUF
5  His experiments on indigo had been no more successful in the Jardin des Plantes than in his garden at Austerlitz.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 9: CHAPTER III—M. MABEUF
6  Through this simple act, the entire social community will experience a diminution of misery and an augmentation of health.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VI—FUTURE PROGRESS
7  A damned soul, who, in the midst of the furnace, should suddenly perceive the outlet of Gehenna, would experience what Jean Valjean felt.
Les Misérables (V5) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII—ONE SOMETIMES RUNS AGROUND WHEN ONE FANCIES ...
8  Madeleine clothed in the scarf which gave him authority over the town, he felt the sort of shudder which a watch-dog might experience on smelling a wolf in his master's clothes.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 5: CHAPTER VII—FAUCHELEVENT BECOMES A GARDENER IN PARIS
9  What we have just said takes away nothing of the anguish of heart which one experiences every time that one meets one of these children around whom one fancies that he beholds floating the threads of a broken family.
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 1: CHAPTER VI—A BIT OF HISTORY
10  There is nothing but the maternal instinct, that admirable intuition composed of the memories of the virgin and the experience of the woman, which knows how this half-light is to be created and of what it should consist.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER IV—CHANGE OF GATE
11  Jean Valjean had no experience of these miseries, the only miseries which are charming and the only ones with which he was not acquainted; the consequence was that he did not understand the grave significance of Cosette's silence.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 3: CHAPTER VII—TO ONE SADNESS OPPOSE A SADNESS AND A HALF
12  Jean Valjean would have renewed these attempts, utterly useless and foolish as they were, as often as the opportunity had presented itself, without reflecting for an instant on the result, nor on the experiences which he had already gone through.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 2: CHAPTER VII—THE INTERIOR OF DESPAIR
13  He had exhibited phenomena at fairs, and he had owned a booth with a trumpet and this poster: "Babet, Dental Artist, Member of the Academies, makes physical experiments on metals and metalloids, extracts teeth, undertakes stumps abandoned by his brother practitioners."
Les Misérables (V3) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 7: CHAPTER III—BABET, GUEULEMER, CLAQUESOUS, AND ...
14  There exist crab-like souls which are continually retreating towards the darkness, retrograding in life rather than advancing, employing experience to augment their deformity, growing incessantly worse, and becoming more and more impregnated with an ever-augmenting blackness.
Les Misérables (V1) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 4: CHAPTER II—FIRST SKETCH OF TWO UNPREPOSSESSING FIGURES
15  The reader will remember the great epidemic of croup which ravaged the river districts of the Seine in Paris thirty-five years ago, and of which science took advantage to make experiments on a grand scale as to the efficacy of inhalations of alum, so beneficially replaced at the present day by the external tincture of iodine.
Les Misérables (V4) By Victor Hugo
Get Context   In BOOK 6: CHAPTER I—THE MALICIOUS PLAYFULNESS OF THE WIND