EYES in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Macbeth by William Shakespeare
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 Current Search - eyes in Macbeth
1  Tis the eye of childhood That fears a painted devil.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
2  It is the bloody business which informs Thus to mine eyes.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
3  They did so; to the amazement of mine eyes, That look'd upon't.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
4  The eye wink at the hand, yet let that be, Which the eye fears, when it is done, to see.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
5  Your eye in Scotland Would create soldiers, make our women fight, To doff their dire distresses.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
6  To beguile the time, Look like the time; bear welcome in your eye, Your hand, your tongue: look like the innocent flower, But be the serpent under't.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I
7  Mine eyes are made the fools o the other senses, Or else worth all the rest: I see thee still; And on thy blade and dudgeon, gouts of blood, Which was not so before.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT II
8  Let your remembrance apply to Banquo; Present him eminence, both with eye and tongue: Unsafe the while, that we Must lave our honours in these flattering streams, And make our faces vizards to our hearts, Disguising what they are.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT III
9  How he solicits heaven, Himself best knows, but strangely-visited people, All swoln and ulcerous, pitiful to the eye, The mere despair of surgery, he cures; Hanging a golden stamp about their necks, Put on with holy prayers: and 'tis spoken, To the succeeding royalty he leaves The healing benediction.'
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT IV
10  Besides, this Duncan Hath borne his faculties so meek, hath been So clear in his great office, that his virtues Will plead like angels, trumpet-tongued, against The deep damnation of his taking-off; And pity, like a naked new-born babe, Striding the blast, or heaven's cherubin, hors'd Upon the sightless couriers of the air, Shall blow the horrid deed in every eye, That tears shall drown the wind.
Macbeth By William Shakespeare
Get Context   In ACT I