FAMILY in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - family in Great Expectations
1  I told him that, without deep trimmings, the family was disgraced.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XI
2  When I had been in Mr. Pocket's family a month or two, Mr. and Mrs. Camilla turned up.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
3  But in the general tumbling up of the family, his tumbling out in life somewhere, was a thing to transact itself somehow.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
4  I have been thrown among one family of your relations, Miss Havisham, and have been constantly among them since I went to London.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
5  At the time when I stood in the churchyard reading the family tombstones, I had just enough learning to be able to spell them out.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
6  My father's family name being Pirrip, and my Christian name Philip, my infant tongue could make of both names nothing longer or more explicit than Pip.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter I
7  Miss Havisham's family I took upon myself; intending to communicate with Mr. Matthew Pocket only, and leave him to do as he liked about informing the rest.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
8  When she was dead, I apprehend he first told his daughter what he had done, and then the son became a part of the family, residing in the house you are acquainted with.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXII
9  In about a month after that, the Spider's time with Mr. Pocket was up for good, and, to the great relief of all the house but Mrs. Pocket, he went home to the family hole.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVI
10  Yet I do not call to mind that I was ever in my earlier youth the subject of remark in our social family circle, but some large-handed person took some such ophthalmic steps to patronize me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
11  We found the air as carefully excluded from both, as if air were fatal to life; and there were more dirty clothes and bandboxes under the beds than I should have thought the family possessed.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LIV
12  It came out that the whole of the back of the coach had been taken by a family removing from London, and that there were no places for the two prisoners but on the seat in front behind the coachman.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXVIII
13  Yes, perhaps I ought to mention," said Herbert, who had become curiously crestfallen and meek, since we entered on the interesting theme, "that she is rather below my mother's nonsensical family notions.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXX
14  While Mrs. Pocket tripped up the family with her footstool, read her book of dignities, lost her pocket-handkerchief, told us about her grandpapa, and taught the young idea how to shoot, by shooting it into bed whenever it attracted her notice.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
15  I was not at all remorseful for having unwittingly set those other branches of the Pocket family to the poor arts they practised; because such littlenesses were their natural bent, and would have been evoked by anybody else, if I had left them slumbering.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
16  I wondered whether the two swollen faces were of Mr. Jaggers's family, and, if he were so unfortunate as to have had a pair of such ill-looking relations, why he stuck them on that dusty perch for the blacks and flies to settle on, instead of giving them a place at home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XX
17  My construction even of their simple meaning was not very correct, for I read "wife of the Above" as a complimentary reference to my father's exaltation to a better world; and if any one of my deceased relations had been referred to as "Below," I have no doubt I should have formed the worst opinions of that member of the family.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
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