FATE in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from The Aeneid by Virgil
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 Current Search - fate in The Aeneid
1  Perchance too thou mayest inquire what was Priam's fate.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
2  Him shall fate but shew to earth, and suffer not to stay further.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
3  Twice had he essayed to portray thy fate in gold; twice the father's hands dropped down.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
4  Goddess-born, follow we fate's ebb and flow, whatsoever it shall be; fortune must be borne to be overcome.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
5  But me my fate and the Laconian woman's murderous guilt thus dragged down to doom; these are the records of her leaving.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
6  Here was her armour, here her chariot; even now, if fate permit, the goddess strives to nurture it for queen of the nations.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
7  This was the end of Priam's fortunes; thus did allotted fate find him, with burning Troy and her sunken towers before his eyes, once magnificent lord over so many peoples and lands of Asia.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
8  This is he, the wanderer from a foreign home, foreshewn of fate for his son, and called to a realm of equal dominion, whose race should be excellent in valour and their might overbear all the world.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
9  When borne hither thou drawest nigh the Cymaean city, the haunted lakes and rustling woods of Avernus, thou shalt behold the raving prophetess who deep in the rock chants of fate, and marks down her words on leaves.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK THIRD
10  But lord Aeneas, dismayed by the bitter mischance, revolved at heart this way and that his shifting weight of care, whether, forgetting fate, he should rest in Sicilian fields, or reach forth to the borders of Italy.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
11  So let thine eyes trace it home, and thine hand pluck it duly when found; for lightly and unreluctant will it follow if thine is fate's summons; else will no strength of thine avail to conquer it nor hard steel to cut it away.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SIXTH
12  Broken in war and beaten back by fate, and so many years now slid away, the Grecian captains build by Pallas' divine craft a horse of mountainous build, ribbed with sawn fir; they feign it vowed for their return, and this rumour goes about.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SECOND
13  For since neither by fate did she perish, nor as one who had earned her death, but woefully before her day, and fired by sudden madness, not yet had Proserpine taken her lock from the golden head, nor sentenced her to the Stygian under world.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
14  Did fate allow me to guide my life by mine own government, and calm my sorrows as I would, my first duty were to the Trojan city and the dear remnant of my kindred; the high house of Priam should abide, and my hand had set up Troy towers anew for a conquered people.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FOURTH
15  Aeneas was our king, foremost of men in righteousness, incomparable in goodness as in warlike arms; whom if fate still preserves, if he draws the breath of heaven and lies not yet low in dispiteous gloom, fear we have none; nor mayest thou repent of challenging the contest of service.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIRST
16  But Venus meanwhile, wrought upon with distress, accosts Neptune, and thus pours forth her heart's complaint: 'Juno's bitter wrath and heart insatiable compel me, O Neptune, to sink to the uttermost of entreaty: neither length of days nor any goodness softens her, nor doth Jove's command and fate itself break her to desistence.'
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK FIFTH
17  How terrible the tempest that burst from fierce Mycenae over the plains of Ida, driven by what fate Europe and Asia met in the shock of two worlds, even he hath heard who is sundered in the utmost land where the ocean surge recoils, and he whom stretching midmost of the four zones the zone of the intolerable sun holds in severance.
The Aeneid By Virgil
Get Context   In BOOK SEVENTH
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