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Quotes from The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli
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 Current Search - feared in The Prince
1  For men injure either from fear or hatred.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII — CONCERNING NEW PRINCIPALITIES WHICH ARE ...
2  He became hated by the whole world, and also feared by those he had around him, to such an extent that he was murdered in the midst of his army by a centurion.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX — THAT ONE SHOULD AVOID BEING DESPISED AND ...
3  Besides this, he saw the arms of Italy, especially those by which he might have been assisted, in hands that would fear the aggrandizement of the Pope, namely, the Orsini and the Colonnesi and their following.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII — CONCERNING NEW PRINCIPALITIES WHICH ARE ...
4  This coolness arises partly from fear of the opponents, who have the laws on their side, and partly from the incredulity of men, who do not readily believe in new things until they have had a long experience of them.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER VI — CONCERNING NEW PRINCIPALITIES WHICH ARE ...
5  Besides this, the country is not pillaged by your officials; the subjects are satisfied by prompt recourse to the prince; thus, wishing to be good, they have more cause to love him, and wishing to be otherwise, to fear him.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER III — CONCERNING MIXED PRINCIPALITIES
6  But as to the future he had to fear, in the first place, that a new successor to the Church might not be friendly to him and might seek to take from him that which Alexander had given him, so he decided to act in four ways.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER VII — CONCERNING NEW PRINCIPALITIES WHICH ARE ...
7  For whereas in general the conspirator has to fear before the execution of his plot, in this case he has also to fear the sequel to the crime; because on account of it he has the people for an enemy, and thus cannot hope for any escape.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX — THAT ONE SHOULD AVOID BEING DESPISED AND ...
8  After these murders Oliverotto, mounted on horseback, rode up and down the town and besieged the chief magistrate in the palace, so that in fear the people were forced to obey him, and to form a government, of which he made himself the prince.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER VIII — CONCERNING THOSE WHO HAVE OBTAINED A ...
9  Nevertheless he ought to be slow to believe and to act, nor should he himself show fear, but proceed in a temperate manner with prudence and humanity, so that too much confidence may not make him incautious and too much distrust render him intolerable.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII — CONCERNING CRUELTY AND CLEMENCY, AND ...
10  But when for their own ambitious ends they shun binding themselves, it is a token that they are giving more thought to themselves than to you, and a prince ought to guard against such, and to fear them as if they were open enemies, because in adversity they always help to ruin him.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX — CONCERNING A CIVIL PRINCIPALITY
11  Nevertheless a prince ought to inspire fear in such a way that, if he does not win love, he avoids hatred; because he can endure very well being feared whilst he is not hated, which will always be as long as he abstains from the property of his citizens and subjects and from their women.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII — CONCERNING CRUELTY AND CLEMENCY, AND ...
12  Nevertheless a prince ought to inspire fear in such a way that, if he does not win love, he avoids hatred; because he can endure very well being feared whilst he is not hated, which will always be as long as he abstains from the property of his citizens and subjects and from their women.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII — CONCERNING CRUELTY AND CLEMENCY, AND ...
13  Upon this, one has to remark that men ought either to be well treated or crushed, because they can avenge themselves of lighter injuries, of more serious ones they cannot; therefore the injury that is to be done to a man ought to be of such a kind that one does not stand in fear of revenge.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER III — CONCERNING MIXED PRINCIPALITIES
14  Returning to the question of being feared or loved, I come to the conclusion that, men loving according to their own will and fearing according to that of the prince, a wise prince should establish himself on that which is in his own control and not in that of others; he must endeavour only to avoid hatred, as is noted.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XVII — CONCERNING CRUELTY AND CLEMENCY, AND ...
15  But concerning his subjects, when affairs outside are disturbed he has only to fear that they will conspire secretly, from which a prince can easily secure himself by avoiding being hated and despised, and by keeping the people satisfied with him, which it is most necessary for him to accomplish, as I said above at length.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XIX — THAT ONE SHOULD AVOID BEING DESPISED AND ...
16  The worst that a prince may expect from a hostile people is to be abandoned by them; but from hostile nobles he has not only to fear abandonment, but also that they will rise against him; for they, being in these affairs more far-seeing and astute, always come forward in time to save themselves, and to obtain favours from him whom they expect to prevail.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER IX — CONCERNING A CIVIL PRINCIPALITY
17  And if the Venetians and Florentines formerly extended their dominions by these arms, and yet their captains did not make themselves princes, but have defended them, I reply that the Florentines in this case have been favoured by chance, for of the able captains, of whom they might have stood in fear, some have not conquered, some have been opposed, and others have turned their ambitions elsewhere.
The Prince By Niccolo Machiavelli
Get Context   In CHAPTER XII — HOW MANY KINDS OF SOLDIERY THERE ARE, AND ...
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