FEELS in Classic Quotes

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Quotes from Great Expectations by Charles Dickens
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 Current Search - feels in Great Expectations
1  "I feel thankful that I have been ill, Joe," I said.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter LVII
2  It is a most miserable thing to feel ashamed of home.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
3  I feel a particular interest in being acquainted with it.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVIII
4  There was no other merit in this, than my having sense enough to feel my deficiencies.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXV
5  The time came, without bringing with it any relief to my feelings, and the company came.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter IV
6  I could feel the muscles of the thin arm round my neck swell with the vehemence that possessed her.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXIX
7  The rush of the daylight quite confounded me, and made me feel as if I had been in the candlelight of the strange room many hours.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
8  I had never parted from him before, and what with my feelings and what with soapsuds, I could at first see no stars from the chaise-cart.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
9  It had been a fine bright day, but had become foggy as the sun dropped, and I had had to feel my way back among the shipping, pretty carefully.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLVII
10  As I cried, I kicked the wall, and took a hard twist at my hair; so bitter were my feelings, and so sharp was the smart without a name, that needed counteraction.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VIII
11  After that, when we went in to supper, the place and the meal would have a more homely look than ever, and I would feel more ashamed of home than ever, in my own ungracious breast.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XIV
12  Well," said Joe, passing the poker into his left hand, that he might feel his whisker; and I had no hope of him whenever he took to that placid occupation; "your sister's a master-mind.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter VII
13  But, in this separation, I associate you only with the good; and I will faithfully hold you to that always, for you must have done me far more good than harm, let me feel now what sharp distress I may.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIV
14  Soothed by my exertions, my method, and Herbert's compliments, I would sit with his symmetrical bundle and my own on the table before me among the stationary, and feel like a Bank of some sort, rather than a private individual.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXIV
15  So contaminated did I feel, remembering who was coming, that the coach came quickly after all, and I was not yet free from the soiling consciousness of Mr. Wemmick's conservatory, when I saw her face at the coach window and her hand waving to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XXXII
16  The mournfulness of the place and time, and the great terror of this illusion, though it was but momentary, caused me to feel an indescribable awe as I came out between the open wooden gates where I had once wrung my hair after Estella had wrung my heart.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter XLIX
17  In pursuance of this luminous conception I mentioned to Biddy when I went to Mr. Wopsle's great-aunt's at night, that I had a particular reason for wishing to get on in life, and that I should feel very much obliged to her if she would impart all her learning to me.
Great Expectations By Charles Dickens
Get Context   In Chapter X
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