FINALS in Classic Quotes

Simple words can express big ideas - learn how great writers to make beautiful sentences with common words.
Quotes from The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald
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 Current Search - finals in The Great Gatsby
1  "I'll call you up," I said finally.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 8
2  She had lost in the finals the week before.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 3
3  "I married him because I thought he was a gentleman," she said finally.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 2
4  Probably it was some final guest who had been away at the ends of the earth and didn't know that the party was over.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 9
5  I tried four times; finally an exasperated central told me the wire was being kept open for long distance from Detroit.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 8
6  All my aunts and uncles talked it over as if they were choosing a prep-school for me and finally said, "Why--ye-es" with very grave, hesitant faces.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 1
7  For several weeks I didn't see him or hear his voice on the phone--mostly I was in New York, trotting around with Jordan and trying to ingratiate myself with her senile aunt--but finally I went over to his house one Sunday afternoon.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 6
8  This is a valley of ashes--a fantastic farm where ashes grow like wheat into ridges and hills and grotesque gardens where ashes take the forms of houses and chimneys and rising smoke and finally, with a transcendent effort, of men who move dimly and already crumbling through the powdery air.
The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald
Get Context   In Chapter 2